New to OA Collecting, Advice, tips?
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1,014 posts in this topic

On 9/18/2021 at 5:11 AM, vodou said:

Of all your 200 posts in three years...this above is my favorite. Thank you!

:devil:

Thanks for your comment. I think I'll discontinue any posts with you and I'd appreciate if you'd do the same with me. I'm sure it's not your intention but you're kind of acting like a stalker. Have a nice life. 

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On 9/18/2021 at 10:48 AM, captain_em said:

Thanks for your comment. I think I'll discontinue any posts with you and I'd appreciate if you'd do the same with me. I'm sure it's not your intention but you're kind of acting like a stalker. Have a nice life. 

Lot’s of people engage in good natured kidding here, both give and take. I’ve taken out, and fouled up, my share of posts, and V is just having a little fun the same as other people. Think of it as a sign of acceptance to the group; you can better appreciate it later. V is good people.

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Itoya seems to stop at 18x24 inches with their portfolios. I'm looking at a piece slightly larger than that.  Any suggestions for storage? I guess above a certain size, a binder with pages makes less sense, but I don't have space for a huge art cabinet, especially one to hold pieces larger than 18x24.

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On 10/15/2021 at 9:27 AM, RBerman said:

Itoya seems to stop at 18x24 inches with their portfolios. I'm looking at a piece slightly larger than that.  Any suggestions for storage? I guess above a certain size, a binder with pages makes less sense, but I don't have space for a huge art cabinet, especially one to hold pieces larger than 18x24.

It's not the cheapest thing but Baroque (Bottleneck Gallery) makes 24x36 for screenprints and also a larger one at 27x41

Comes with a zipper and strap too. 

https://www.baroqueportfolios.com/collections/all/products/deluxe-print-storage-portfolio

Vault Displays has a 24x36 but it's currently sold out.

https://vaultdisplays.com/collections/all-products/products/24-x-36-portfolio

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I'm coming into a high value piece soon and am going back and forth on the best way to display it while ensuring its long term preservation.  I have a few expensive prints ($250 giclee) with remarks that i've bought in the past that I display framed/matted and behind museum acrylic glass.  These pieces are in a room where the blinds have been shut year round so there's no direct sunlight, only ambient lighting.  The only actual light affecting these prints are those from the EnergySaver LED bulbs from a floor lamp on the opposite side of the room (12 feet away) that is on roughly 6 hours each night.  (It's my office by day, game/computer/let me surf the CGC boards room by night).  I mention this, because the high value piece would be displayed under similar conditions.

With that preface out of the way, I'm unsure what long term effects LED lighting has on artwork, even when it's protected by 99% UV museum acrylic.  Obviously, the most fool proof thing would be to scan and print a hi-res copy and display that without concern, but sometimes that's hard to do since the local printers won't print copyrighted material.  Additionally, there's something mentally about knowing that the piece you're looking at is the original.  I guess I'm looking to see what approach you more experienced collectors take with the really expensive pieces in your collection.  Do those go in a portfolio tucked away, or should the art be perfectly fine given the conditions I mentioned?

(PS: live in an area where humidity isn't an issue and ambient room temperatures rarely venture into the extremes on either end of the spectrum if that makes a difference.)

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On 11/7/2021 at 11:48 PM, ExNihilo said:

I'm coming into a high value piece soon and am going back and forth on the best way to display it while ensuring its long term preservation.  I have a few expensive prints ($250 giclee) with remarks that i've bought in the past that I display framed/matted and behind museum acrylic glass.  These pieces are in a room where the blinds have been shut year round so there's no direct sunlight, only ambient lighting.  The only actual light affecting these prints are those from the EnergySaver LED bulbs from a floor lamp on the opposite side of the room (12 feet away) that is on roughly 6 hours each night.  (It's my office by day, game/computer/let me surf the CGC boards room by night).  I mention this, because the high value piece would be displayed under similar conditions.

With that preface out of the way, I'm unsure what long term effects LED lighting has on artwork, even when it's protected by 99% UV museum acrylic.  Obviously, the most fool proof thing would be to scan and print a hi-res copy and display that without concern, but sometimes that's hard to do since the local printers won't print copyrighted material.  Additionally, there's something mentally about knowing that the piece you're looking at is the original.  I guess I'm looking to see what approach you more experienced collectors take with the really expensive pieces in your collection.  Do those go in a portfolio tucked away, or should the art be perfectly fine given the conditions I mentioned?

(PS: live in an area where humidity isn't an issue and ambient room temperatures rarely venture into the extremes on either end of the spectrum if that makes a difference.)

I just framed my most high value piece using a reputable art gallery locally.  The price was, frankly, breathtaking to me ... about $1,500 (Its a very large piece too).  It would have been more if I had gone with museum acrylic instead of museum glass.  That being said the focus was on long term preservation.  They had several tiers of materials in which there was a direct correlation between length of preservation and costs.  For the longest preservation (they said 100 yers plus) would have been north of $2K.  I went for one tier down.

This is all to say, go to a gallery to advise you, but be prepared for the price tag.

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On 11/9/2021 at 9:11 AM, Heidjer Staecker said:

I just framed my most high value piece using a reputable art gallery locally.  The price was, frankly, breathtaking to me ... about $1,500 (Its a very large piece too).  It would have been more if I had gone with museum acrylic instead of museum glass.  That being said the focus was on long term preservation.  They had several tiers of materials in which there was a direct correlation between length of preservation and costs.  For the longest preservation (they said 100 yers plus) would have been north of $2K.  I went for one tier down.

This is all to say, go to a gallery to advise you, but be prepared for the price tag.

Ooph, $1500?!  For the prints, I was okay with just taking them to Michaels, but for this one I'm definitely going to the frame specialist.  They're more expensive, but they also probably know more about the nuances of art.

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On 11/9/2021 at 12:13 PM, Webhead2018 said:

What's the different from museum glass and acrylic glass?

Acrylic is more resistant to shattering.  Living in an earthquake zone, I always get acrylic just as an extra precaution.  Obviously, the best thing to do is to hang art such that it won't fall when the walls shake, but it's always good to be prepared just in case.

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On 11/9/2021 at 12:11 PM, Heidjer Staecker said:

I just framed my most high value piece using a reputable art gallery locally.  The price was, frankly, breathtaking to me ... about $1,500 (Its a very large piece too).  It would have been more if I had gone with museum acrylic instead of museum glass.  That being said the focus was on long term preservation.  They had several tiers of materials in which there was a direct correlation between length of preservation and costs.  For the longest preservation (they said 100 yers plus) would have been north of $2K.  I went for one tier down.

This is all to say, go to a gallery to advise you, but be prepared for the price tag.

I don’t claim to have much expertise in this field, other than what I have read and some personal experience, but that sounds like overkill and an easy sale for the “expert”. If it were being displayed in a sunlit area, or involved markers, I would be more concerned, but more common, low-e glass and floating hinges would seem to be adequate. If you’ve ever seen the photo’s of Romitaman’s collection, I can’t imagine he was out spending $1,500 a piece on those. But, I could also be wrong. There are some people here who really know the right answer, like Aokartman. Maybe they could chime in.

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On 11/10/2021 at 5:11 AM, Rick2you2 said:

I don’t claim to have much expertise in this field, other than what I have read and some personal experience, but that sounds like overkill and an easy sale for the “expert”. If it were being displayed in a sunlit area, or involved markers, I would be more concerned, but more common, low-e glass and floating hinges would seem to be adequate. If you’ve ever seen the photo’s of Romitaman’s collection, I can’t imagine he was out spending $1,500 a piece on those. But, I could also be wrong. There are some people here who really know the right answer, like Aokartman. Maybe they could chime in.

This was a first for me.  Most of my stuff is in the $75-100 frame range and has museum glass etc.  This was a special case.  The size, cost, and medium (paint and collage) made me want to go the extra mile.  Also, I live in TX and heat and fading was very much a concern for me.

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@Heidjer Staecker, the big worries are heat, humidity, and ultra-violet light. A/C will handle first two. LEDs (unlike fluorescent bulbs) emit very little UV so if the shutters are closed, you should be fine. I'd prefer incandescent lights, but ...

There's a lot on the web about UV from LEDs and they all say the same thing.

 

 

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On 11/10/2021 at 9:24 AM, Heidjer Staecker said:

This was a first for me.  Most of my stuff is in the $75-100 frame range and has museum glass etc.  This was a special case.  The size, cost, and medium (paint and collage) made me want to go the extra mile.  Also, I live in TX and heat and fading was very much a concern for me.

Most of my good art with the floating hinges, archival matting, museum glass etc costs me around $600-800.  The prices might be a little higher now with the supply chain crisis but not that much higher. 

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On 11/9/2021 at 7:48 PM, ExNihilo said:

Acrylic is more resistant to shattering.  Living in an earthquake zone, I always get acrylic just as an extra precaution.  Obviously, the best thing to do is to hang art such that it won't fall when the walls shake, but it's always good to be prepared just in case.

On 11/9/2021 at 2:13 PM, Webhead2018 said:

What's the different from museum glass and acrylic glass?

It's good to know that there are varying levels of acrylic. So, if you really want to compare museum glass to something, you'd compare it to museum acrylic.

Like ExNihilo said, museum acrylic is shatter resistant. It's also more resistant to static as well, as well as being more resistant to scratches as well.

It's also lighter in weight.

However, the major drawback is that it simply isn't as clear, and much more reflective from my experience (I have a half dozen pieces using a mix of both museum acrylic and museum glass).

 

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On 11/27/2021 at 8:05 PM, alxjhnsn said:

@Heidjer Staecker, the big worries are heat, humidity, and ultra-violet light. A/C will handle first two. LEDs (unlike fluorescent bulbs) emit very little UV so if the shutters are closed, you should be fine. I'd prefer incandescent lights, but ...

There's a lot on the web about UV from LEDs and they all say the same thing.

 

 

Why in the hell would anyone prefer incandescents?

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On 12/14/2021 at 2:58 PM, aqn83 said:

Why in the hell would anyone prefer incandescents?

The light is typically warmer for living in, but, I don’t know if that is still true. Or maybe, I’ve just gotten used to the cold glare of reality.

 

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On 12/14/2021 at 2:46 PM, Rick2you2 said:

The light is typically warmer for living in, but, I don’t know if that is still true. Or maybe, I’ve just gotten used to the cold glare of reality.

 

I used to have incandescents (thought they were LED and was sadly mistaken when a bulb burned out and went to get a replacement bulb from the box only to realize it was incandescent).  Thankfully I'm just getting my feet wet with OA so I didn't have anything of real value on display or for that long.  I immediately switched to LED and can confirm there's no noticeable difference in color warmth vs the incandescent bulbs.  Just steer clear of the daylight white because it feels unnatural...almost sterile.  I use soft white in all my rooms.

Edited by ExNihilo
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On 12/14/2021 at 4:46 PM, Rick2you2 said:

The light is typically warmer for living in, but, I don’t know if that is still true. Or maybe, I’ve just gotten used to the cold glare of reality.

 

Times have changed, old man! They have LEDs in a variety of temperatures. There is absolutely no reason anyone should ever use anything other than LED lights.

On 12/14/2021 at 5:34 PM, ExNihilo said:

I used to have incandescents (thought they were LED and was sadly mistaken when a bulb burned out and went to get a replacement bulb from the box only to realize it was incandescent).  Thankfully I'm just getting my feet wet with OA so I didn't have anything of real value on display or for that long.  I immediately switched to LED and can confirm there's no noticeable difference in color warmth vs the incandescent bulbs.  Just steer clear of the daylight white because it feels unnatural...almost sterile.  I use soft white in all my rooms.

I cringe every time I walk passed a house that is outfitted with cool lights.

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