What are the rarest romance comics?
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Mmmmm....maybe....but my posting is slowing down a little. It's work time full blast...I'm working right now... :roflmao:But, here's one for 29dukedog... (don't know if i've posted it before or not....)

 

152noyw.jpg

 

:takeit:

 

I sure do need to upgrade this issue...

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I wonder where she's going with that baseball player and what they might be doing? It's not very clear... Maybe they're going to a comic book show... (shrug)

 

I read the story. Turns out the game goes extra innings and she runs off with the peanut vendor.

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Quality control was a problem at Charlton. Didn't they have their own presses?

 

After years of sending out the printing to New York shops, in the late '40s Charlton set up operations in a 150, 000 square-foot building in Derby. The partners' philosophy, unique in the publishing industry, was that the cheapest and most efficient way to produce periodicals would be to to establish an "all-in-one" operation; that is, have everything under one roof—editorial, printing, distribution—eliminating any middle-man expenses and maximizing profit. The Charlton Building housed three sister companies: Charlton Press, Charlton Publications, and Capitol Distribution, with an off-site auxiliary concern, The Colonial Paper Company.

 

At approximately 10:00 a. m., Friday, August 18th, 1955, a natural disaster struck that changed everything for the staffers at Charlton, and even threatened to close the company's doors down permanently. The aftermath of Hurricane Diane cut a swath of destruction through the Carolinas, New York, Pennsylvania, Massachusetts and, of course, Connecticut. Eleven inches of rainfall caused massive flooding that claimed the lives of hundreds of victims in the Connecticut Valley area. All 129 acres of the Charlton grounds were submerged in 18 feet of water. $300, 000 worth of paper inventory, mats, comics art work, and plates, among other things, were destroyed by the flood in minutes.

 

"When the flood came through," Burton N. Levey, cousin to co-owner Ed Levy and Charlton executive, said, "we had to get on top of the building because the water was rising, and a helicopter landed on the roof and took us off—that's how I got out of there! I watched my car float down the river."

 

"The press was entirely underwater, the building was underwater," Joe Gill said. "[Artist] Maurice 'Reese' Whitman had to be taken off the roof by helicopter. Cars were washed away. When the smoke cleared, Santangelo called a meeting of the artists and myself. He was an inspired speaker in his broken English, and said he was going to carry on (though, in the meanwhile, the guy had gotten umpteen dollars in flood relief from the government, for free; this was an enormous boost for him), but he couldn't continue to pay us the same 'high rates. ' He said that we could all continue working at half of what we had been working before. I was dropped to two dollars a page [a quarter of what the major companies were paying at the time]."

 

The Charlton Empire

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Quality control was a problem at Charlton. Didn't they have their own presses?

 

After years of sending out the printing to New York shops, in the late '40s Charlton set up operations in a 150, 000 square-foot building in Derby. The partners' philosophy, unique in the publishing industry, was that the cheapest and most efficient way to produce periodicals would be to to establish an "all-in-one" operation; that is, have everything under one roof—editorial, printing, distribution—eliminating any middle-man expenses and maximizing profit. The Charlton Building housed three sister companies: Charlton Press, Charlton Publications, and Capitol Distribution, with an off-site auxiliary concern, The Colonial Paper Company.

 

At approximately 10:00 a. m., Friday, August 18th, 1955, a natural disaster struck that changed everything for the staffers at Charlton, and even threatened to close the company's doors down permanently. The aftermath of Hurricane Diane cut a swath of destruction through the Carolinas, New York, Pennsylvania, Massachusetts and, of course, Connecticut. Eleven inches of rainfall caused massive flooding that claimed the lives of hundreds of victims in the Connecticut Valley area. All 129 acres of the Charlton grounds were submerged in 18 feet of water. $300, 000 worth of paper inventory, mats, comics art work, and plates, among other things, were destroyed by the flood in minutes.

 

"When the flood came through," Burton N. Levey, cousin to co-owner Ed Levy and Charlton executive, said, "we had to get on top of the building because the water was rising, and a helicopter landed on the roof and took us off—that's how I got out of there! I watched my car float down the river."

 

"The press was entirely underwater, the building was underwater," Joe Gill said. "[Artist] Maurice 'Reese' Whitman had to be taken off the roof by helicopter. Cars were washed away. When the smoke cleared, Santangelo called a meeting of the artists and myself. He was an inspired speaker in his broken English, and said he was going to carry on (though, in the meanwhile, the guy had gotten umpteen dollars in flood relief from the government, for free; this was an enormous boost for him), but he couldn't continue to pay us the same 'high rates. ' He said that we could all continue working at half of what we had been working before. I was dropped to two dollars a page [a quarter of what the major companies were paying at the time]."

 

The Charlton Empire

 

thanks for sharing, all that OA gone for ever.

 

 

 

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Relatively rare. The other 7.5 went on ComicConnect a little over a year ago, a cleaner cover but PQ was off. And there's the Crippen 9.0. And three lesser slabs.

 

Nice book! (thumbs u

 

love the cover, thanks for the info.

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How rare is this one.

 

E5C9DAC6-6473-480A-8DAF-CC55D83C2E60_zpszrgq5slz.jpg

 

 

Definitely rare for the condition. However, I have seen my share of lower grade copies of this book over the past 20+ years. Nice copy!

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I have not seen many of these in my time.

 

photo HoneymoonRomances2_zps4a4cee49.jpg

Wow! This is the first one of these I've seen. The first issue has popped up a few times in recent years, but I've never seen this one for sale. (Wait- I take that back... wasn't there an eBay seller within the past year who had both issues up for sale?) Edited by 29dukedog
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