Disney's Indiana Jones
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China is player even for beyond the obvious reasons (population and where they are going with capitalism and just socially), but also because some large pieces of financing for these gigantic films are coming from Chinese entities (one example is the Chinese company that recently invested into VALIANT).

 

I'm not sure we will see any backissue interest if we are talking classic physical copies. If anything we are talking more digital readers. Remember, this golden era of comic book movies now hasn't really moved the needle from an overall sales level. Some really good comics selling laughable number of copies in the midst of comics and Star Wars being the most popular things in pop culture.\

 

Don't know if this was mentioned (maybe it's linked above, sorry if it is) but Spielberg has stated he will not cast a new Indiana Jones.

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The China-Valiant connection interests me more now because of what Iger says,and who are Marvel`s biggest Chinese characters?

These could be something to look at now in the back issue market more intensely.

 

That is the Chinese company that encouraged Marvel to insert locally filmed footage so regional viewers could relate to Iron Man 3 more. They were a big help in making that movie a massive hit in the area.

 

They had nothing to do with the filming itself. So I wouldn't blame them for how the Chinese scenes were shot. But the logic made sense.

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China is player even for beyond the obvious reasons (population and where they are going with capitalism and just socially), but also because some large pieces of financing for these gigantic films are coming from Chinese entities (one example is the Chinese company that recently invested into VALIANT).

 

I'm not sure we will see any backissue interest if we are talking classic physical copies. If anything we are talking more digital readers. Remember, this golden era of comic book movies now hasn't really moved the needle from an overall sales level. Some really good comics selling laughable number of copies in the midst of comics and Star Wars being the most popular things in pop culture.\

 

Don't know if this was mentioned (maybe it's linked above, sorry if it is) but Spielberg has stated he will not cast a new Indiana Jones.

 

That may not be Spielberg's decision. Is it definite that Disney would hire him to direct an Indiana Jones movie?

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China is player even for beyond the obvious reasons (population and where they are going with capitalism and just socially), but also because some large pieces of financing for these gigantic films are coming from Chinese entities (one example is the Chinese company that recently invested into VALIANT).

 

I'm not sure we will see any backissue interest if we are talking classic physical copies. If anything we are talking more digital readers. Remember, this golden era of comic book movies now hasn't really moved the needle from an overall sales level. Some really good comics selling laughable number of copies in the midst of comics and Star Wars being the most popular things in pop culture.\

 

Don't know if this was mentioned (maybe it's linked above, sorry if it is) but Spielberg has stated he will not cast a new Indiana Jones.

 

That may not be Spielberg's decision. Is it definite that Disney would hire him to direct an Indiana Jones movie?

 

Obviously I'm not an insider but I think if Steven Spielberg wants to direct your Indiana Jones movie you let him. Even the last one, which kind of sucked, made bank and he's Steven Spielberg.

 

I think if Disney wants Ford (and I have to think his fairly easy return to Star Wars might have had a behind the scenes hand shake about it, but that's a pure guess) then I think Spielberg will be directing him. I don't know if we are going to be living in a world where there is a simultaneous recast of Han Solo and Indiana Jones.

 

In the future? Sure, definitely think Disney is going to try to find an heir to the franchise but I do think Ford will be involved somehow, and if he is, Spielberg will be and I have to think that's the best of both worlds.

 

Personally I'd love a reboot or passing of the torch. I can't imagine Ford can carry it anymore. but he can definitely do a Connery, he kind of did that in Force Awakens.

 

 

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I didn't realize Paramount retained rights on the original movies.

 

Disney Takes Control of 'Indiana Jones' Franchise for Future Films

 

Disney and Paramount have reached an agreement for the future of the Indiana Jones franchise, giving Disney control over all future films.

 

Paramount retains rights to the first four films and "will receive a financial participation on any future films that are produced and released," says the statement from the studios.

 

The deal paves the way for a new installment in the franchise, although no official news about a fifth film being in the works has been announced. While doing press for other films, Ford has mentioned that he'd be open to the idea of returning to the character, but of course reboots and prequels with new actors could also be an option.

 

The last film in the franchise, The Crystal Skull, grossed $786.6 million at the worldwide box office.

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And so it will be Disney's next $750,000,000+ movie....

 

I see this breaking the $1 Billion mark.

 

Disney Stock in 2019 :cloud9:

Avengers Infinity War

Star Wars: Well whatever they have planned that year

Indiana Jones

 

CNN Money

 

The Guardian

 

 

 

 

 

 

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Yeah people complained about the fridge but had no problem with jumping out of a plane with two other people on a rubber raft and then skidding down the Himalayan mountains in that very raft.

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How expensive is it to insure Harrison Ford as Indiana Jones?

 

Vulture.com: How Expensive is it to Insure Harrison Ford?

 

Let's throw out a little scenario. You're the Walt Disney Company. Star Wars: The Force Awakens has made more than $2 billion worldwide, becoming one of only three movies to ever accomplish that feat, and you realize something: You have another franchise lying dormant that also stars Harrison Ford. Maybe you should get that back on its feet, too. That would be great! Except — it also stars Harrison Ford.

 

With the fifth Indiana Jones movie now slated for release on July 19, 2019, Disney is betting that the 73-year-old actor is still capable of leading an action tentpole. Granted, Ford wasn't exactly Jacob Tremblay at time of the fourth Indy installment — when Kingdom of the Crystal Skull came out, in 2008, he was about to turn 66 — but he'll be 77 when the new one arrives. It isn't his age that's so much an issue, though; 100 is the new 50, or something. It's more what he chooses to do in his old age. Like make action movies. And fly planes.

 

In 2014, while filming The Force Awakens, Ford broke his leg when he was hit by a door on the set of the Millennium Falcon, an incident that later led to British workplace safety authorities suing one of the production companies behind the movie. The broken leg caused a break in production, though they didn't end up having to shoot around Han Solo, as was initially feared. Then in March of last year, Ford was involved in the emergency crash-landing of a small plane he was piloting. He wasn't badly injured, and the crash didn't delay the film, but much like how athletes can come to be thought of as injury-prone, Ford now seemed to be a lightning rod for these incidents.

 

Which leads to a question: How expensive is this dude to insure?

 

To find out, Vulture called Brian Kingman, managing director at Gallagher Entertainment, which brokers cast insurance for movie productions. For films like The Force Awakens or the fifth Indiana Jones, a blanket policy tends to cover 16 to 18 people, usually including the essential elements behind the camera, like the director, cinematographer, and the major actors. That necessary line-item will typically cost about half a point — or .5 percent — of the film's budget. So, if The Force Awakens' budget was $200 million, that means cast insurance would've run about $1 million — but it would've also saved the production the amount that Ford's broken leg cost in delays.

 

But does this all mean that Ford's recent propensity for getting in scrapes will peak Indy 5's insurance bill? Or is this run-of-the-mill stuff considering what these actors are actually doing on set?

 

"If somebody is 70-something years old, that’s not a problem; that’s not even a problem at 80," Kingman said. "Remember that movies are made in 12 to 16 weeks from first camera day to last camera day. So the cast insurance underwriter looks at it and asks, is he healthy, and is it likely that he’s not going to die of old age in four months? More important, almost, is what's going on with his lifestyle. Does this person like to do extreme things at his or her age? Everybody knows Ford likes to fly, and he had a little issue with one of his aircraft, and it was a miracle he didn’t get hurt more seriously."

 

That means, if Ford tells the underwriter that, yes, he's flying on his days off, and, no, he's not going to stop during principal photography, even though he's playing a character who is essential to the film, that could theoretically double the price of insurance, into the realm of a full percentage point of the budget, because without him, the production's a disaster. However, if Ford's lifestyle during the shoot suits the standards requested by the underwriter, it's a different story, as long as medial and physical evaluations indicate that he's in good health, regardless of his age.

 

Is Ford's age and recreational piloting likely to bankrupt Disney, then? Not exactly. But maybe our man should save his death-defying feats for the inside of refrigerators while Indy 5 is shooting.

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Kingdom of the Crystal Skull Writer, David Koepp Confirmed for Indy V

 

Cinemablend: David Koepp and Indy V

 

While the news that Disney has greenlit Indiana Jones 5 was hardly surprising, it was still a delight to hear that both Harrison Ford and Steven Spielberg will return to the franchise. But this excitement has been slightly tempered with the revelation that David Koepp has been hired to write the new installment to the Indy saga. For those of you that don’t know, David Koepp is a long-time Steven Spielberg collaborator whose screen credits include Indiana Jones and the Kindgom of the Crystal Skull. Worried yet?

 

Indiana Jones and the Kingdom of the Crystal Skull was met with a rather mediocre reaction from both fans and critics alike when it was released back in 2009. However, to put all the blame for the film’s failure at the feet of David Koepp, whose participation in Indiana Jones 5 was confirmed by The Hollywood Reporter, would be rather foolish. Especially since it’s hard to know exactly what David Koepp wrote and didn’t write in Crystal Skull's -script.

 

While David Koepp did indeed get a lone screenwriting credit for Indiana Jones and the Kingdom of the Crystal Skull, the story was originaly created by George Lucas and Jeff Nathanson. Plus, the likes of Jeb Stuart, Jeffrey Boam, Frank Darabont, and Jeff Nathanson each wrote different iterations of the -script for Crystal Skull before producers finally approved Koepp’s version.

 

Also, while Indiana Jones and the Kingtom of the Crystal Skull might not be the pinnacle of David Koepp’s career, the screenwriter’s rather sensational CV is proof that he knows what he’s doing when it comes to scribing a film. Especially when he’s worked with Steven Spielberg, as Koepp has written Jurassic Park, The Lord World: Jurassic Park, and War Of The Worlds for the iconic filmmaker, as well as other credits that include Panic Room, Spider-Man, Carlito’s Way, and Mission: Impossible.

 

Obviously, the man knows what he’s doing, even if you view Indiana Jones and the Kingdom of the Crystal Skull as a misstep. While he’ll be more aware than anyone of the failings and reasons why Crystal Skull was met with relative indifference by audiences upon its release, and he’ll hopefully be hell-bent on avoiding these issues with Indiana Jones 5.

 

Plot details regarding Indiana Jones 5 are, unsurprisingly, currently being kept firmly under wraps. We’re not even really sure how long Disney has been developing the film, or if they always knew that Harrison Ford would be back, or if another protagonist will be brought in to help the 73-year-old shoulder the burden.

 

Another big question is will George Lucas be involved in Indiana Jones 5? His name was withheld from Disney’s announcement for the film, and his relationship with the studio is still unclear following Disney’s decision not to use his ideas for what would eventually become Star Wars: The Force Awakens. The safe bet is that he won't have a hand in this either.

 

All of these details will be revealed over the next few months and years. For now, let’s just rejoice in the news that Indiana Jones 5 will be released on July 19, 2019.

 

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Kingdom of the Crystal Skull Writer, David Koepp Confirmed for Indy V

 

It's important to note that the skull concept wasn't his idea, it was George Lucas's. So Koepp can't really be blamed for what most people disliked about that movie.

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Kingdom of the Crystal Skull Writer, David Koepp Confirmed for Indy V

 

It's important to note that the skull concept wasn't his idea, it was George Lucas's. So Koepp can't really be blamed for what most people disliked about that movie.

 

I don't believe that the skull concept was all that bad to tell the truth. I felt that the execution of it was a little off. Indiana Jones was supposed to reflect the time period that he had aged into both chronologically and cinematically.

 

The movie takes place in the 1930's and reflects the cinema of the time with the swashbuckling element.

 

KOTCS takes place in the 1950's when cinema was partially identified by B-Movies. Lucas wanted a B-Movie. There are good B-Movies like the Forbidden Planet and then there are not so good B-Movies.

 

I always argue that a bad Indiana Jones movie is still better than most other movies out there. To tell the truth, I liked KOTCS far more than The Force Awakens. At least with KOTCS Lucas tried to cover new ground.

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Kingdom of the Crystal Skull Writer, David Koepp Confirmed for Indy V

 

It's important to note that the skull concept wasn't his idea, it was George Lucas's. So Koepp can't really be blamed for what most people disliked about that movie.

 

I don't believe that the skull concept was all that bad to tell the truth. I felt that the execution of it was a little off.

 

Perhaps because Spielberg and Ford both hated the idea for years which is why it took almost two decades for another film to come out. They both finally relented after it was obvious Lucas wasn't budging off of the skull concept.

 

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Indiana_Jones_and_the_Kingdom_of_the_Crystal_Skull#Development

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Kingdom of the Crystal Skull Writer, David Koepp Confirmed for Indy V

 

It's important to note that the skull concept wasn't his idea, it was George Lucas's. So Koepp can't really be blamed for what most people disliked about that movie.

 

I don't believe that the skull concept was all that bad to tell the truth. I felt that the execution of it was a little off.

 

Perhaps because Spielberg and Ford both hated the idea for years which is why it took almost two decades for another film to come out. They both finally relented after it was obvious Lucas wasn't budging off of the skull concept.

 

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Indiana_Jones_and_the_Kingdom_of_the_Crystal_Skull#Development

 

Here is one thing that the Wiki article reveals that the media has not mentioned. If Paramount has a deal for a total of five Indiana Jones movies, then what is the deal going to be with Disney in producing and releasing the fifth movie? I am guessing that it will be something similar to what they did with Iron Man 3 but I would imagine the stakes are higher due to the success of the franchise over the success of the Marvel Universe at the time that the deal with Iron Man was hammered out.

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Here is one thing that the Wiki article reveals that the media has not mentioned. If Paramount has a deal for a total of five Indiana Jones movies, then what is the deal going to be with Disney in producing and releasing the fifth movie?

 

If the deal is still in place then it'd be no different than the last four. Paramount distributed them and LucasFilm produced them; that'd still happen with Disney as the parent to LucasFilm. If another one ends the Paramount deal, then it just means their name isn't at the front anymore and Disney distributes the sixth and later films.

 

I haven't heard for sure, but I'm guessing the Paramount deal is still in place and the fact that they get a big cut may be the primary reason Disney has moved so slowly on a new film.

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Kingdom of the Crystal Skull Writer, David Koepp Confirmed for Indy V

 

It's important to note that the skull concept wasn't his idea, it was George Lucas's. So Koepp can't really be blamed for what most people disliked about that movie.

 

I don't believe that the skull concept was all that bad to tell the truth. I felt that the execution of it was a little off.

 

Perhaps because Spielberg and Ford both hated the idea for years which is why it took almost two decades for another film to come out. They both finally relented after it was obvious Lucas wasn't budging off of the skull concept.

 

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Indiana_Jones_and_the_Kingdom_of_the_Crystal_Skull#Development

 

From the link, the skull concept didn't come until after Spielberg was on board for creating another Indiana Jones movie. (shrug) Did you perhaps mean "... budging off of the alien concept."?

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Perhaps because Spielberg and Ford both hated the idea for years which is why it took almost two decades for another film to come out. They both finally relented after it was obvious Lucas wasn't budging off of the skull concept.

 

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Indiana_Jones_and_the_Kingdom_of_the_Crystal_Skull#Development

 

From the link, the skull concept didn't come until after Spielberg was on board for creating another Indiana Jones movie. (shrug) Did you perhaps mean "... budging off of the alien concept."?

 

I've never heard which part of it they didn't like--the crystal skull, the 50s sci-fi elements, or the alien concept--they just didn't like it.

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