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Steven Spielberg says the end is near for superhero movies

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Aren't super-hero movies really just science fiction/fantasy films?

 

They're a sub-genre of that, yes.

 

Exactly!

 

Aren't super-hero movies really just science fiction/fantasy films?

 

Exactly! Just a slightly different genre. But not by much.

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Westerns had a natural time limit built into them--there was only so long that the allure of the Western US could appeal to Americans once we had settled the western part of the country. If superheroes have an equivalent natural limit built into them, I haven't noticed what it is. Extending the limits of humanity seems like a natural step forward, and I have no idea what would hold more appeal in a way that would replace the concept. We've loved them for almost a century, and I see no limit currently in sight.

 

None of that means their replacement isn't right here in front of us in the culture right now, I just haven't noticed which idea makes for a more alluring hero tale than superpowers do. (shrug)

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lol

 

It's both!!

 

When you look at comic book stories versus straightout Sci-Fi or Fantasy, some will take the hardcore stance there is a difference.

 

So yes, it is both because the genre definition can be so loosely defined.

 

;)

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Westerns had a natural time limit built into them--there was only so long that the allure of the Western US could appeal to Americans once we had settled the western part of the country.

 

Actually I think I'm wrong about superheroes replacing Westerns--it's space that replaced them. Westerns went downhill as soon as space became a realistic place to explore once we went into space and onto the moon in the 1960s. The most natural extension of the Western is space-based science-fiction. Space fills the identical exploration appeal that the West did--as Kirk put it, it's the final frontier.

 

Neither Westerns nor space stories replace superheroes. I don't know what would replace them. (shrug) The idea of humans having more capability than evolution has granted us to date may be universal and enduring. hm

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lol

 

It's both!!

 

When you look at comic book stories versus straightout Sci-Fi or Fantasy, some will take the hardcore stance there is a difference.

 

So yes, it is both because the genre definition can be so loosely defined.

 

;)

 

Uh huh

 

Yeah, sure.

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lol

 

It's both!!

 

When you look at comic book stories versus straightout Sci-Fi or Fantasy, some will take the hardcore stance there is a difference.

 

So yes, it is both because the genre definition can be so loosely defined.

 

;)

 

Uh huh

 

Yeah, sure.

 

lol

 

Still the silly boy I remembered.

 

:cloud9:

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Westerns had a natural time limit built into them--there was only so long that the allure of the Western US could appeal to Americans once we had settled the western part of the country.

 

Actually I think I'm wrong about superheroes replacing Westerns--it's space that replaced them. Westerns went downhill as soon as space became a realistic place to explore once we went into space and onto the moon in the 1960s. The most natural extension of the Western is space-based science-fiction. Space fills the identical exploration appeal that the West did--as Kirk put it, it's the final frontier.

 

Neither Westerns nor space stories replace superheroes. I don't know what would replace them. (shrug) The idea of humans having more capability than evolution has granted us to date may be universal and enduring. hm

 

The key word is realistic. This is where superheroes fall flat.

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lol

 

It's both!!

 

When you look at comic book stories versus straightout Sci-Fi or Fantasy, some will take the hardcore stance there is a difference.

 

All superhero tales are either science fiction (Spider-Man or X-Men) or fantasy (Thor), but not all sci-fi or fantasy involves superheroes. Superheroes are a sub-genre where humans gain abilities through fictional science or fantasy means.

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lol

 

It's both!!

 

When you look at comic book stories versus straightout Sci-Fi or Fantasy, some will take the hardcore stance there is a difference.

 

So yes, it is both because the genre definition can be so loosely defined.

 

;)

 

Uh huh

 

Yeah, sure.

 

lol

 

Still the silly boy I remembered.

 

:cloud9:

 

From the guy who has to quote himself to feel "right". Emotional issues continue. ;)

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lol

 

It's both!!

 

When you look at comic book stories versus straightout Sci-Fi or Fantasy, some will take the hardcore stance there is a difference.

 

All superhero tales are either science fiction (Spider-Man or X-Men) or fantasy (Thor), but not all sci-fi or fantasy involves superheroes. Superheroes are a sub-genre where humans gain abilities through fictional science or fantasy means.

 

Apparently it is also its own genre. :eyeroll:

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Westerns had a natural time limit built into them--there was only so long that the allure of the Western US could appeal to Americans once we had settled the western part of the country.

 

Actually I think I'm wrong about superheroes replacing Westerns--it's space that replaced them. Westerns went downhill as soon as space became a realistic place to explore once we went into space and onto the moon in the 1960s. The most natural extension of the Western is space-based science-fiction. Space fills the identical exploration appeal that the West did--as Kirk put it, it's the final frontier.

 

Neither Westerns nor space stories replace superheroes. I don't know what would replace them. (shrug) The idea of humans having more capability than evolution has granted us to date may be universal and enduring. hm

 

The key word is realistic. This is where superheroes fall flat.

 

Science-fiction and fantasy is NEVER completely realistic. Suspension of disbelief is a requirement for the genre to have any appeal.

 

My girlfriend detests suspending disbelief, so she rarely likes any sci-fi or fantasy. Usually only female heroes appeal to her, and they have to be at least a possible future before she likes it. She doesn't mind the Hunger Games, although I think it's mostly because she ignores the politics of it. The politics of that world seem ludicrous to me.

 

The only fantasy film I can recall her liking is "Let the Right One In." She was able to suspend her disbelief on the vampire elements of it because the rest of the film was so good. She can usually get into good ghost stories too, probably a remnant from childhood before she grew to prefer realism for whatever reason.

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All superhero tales are either science fiction (Spider-Man or X-Men) or fantasy (Thor), but not all sci-fi or fantasy involves superheroes. Superheroes are a sub-genre where humans gain abilities through fictional science or fantasy means.

 

Apparently it is also its own genre. :eyeroll:

 

I have no idea what you're getting at. (shrug)

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I tend to think that X-Men started the comic book movie ball rolling. It's been nothing but momentum ever since, and can you believe that movie was released 15 years ago? People are nowhere near burned out by superhero movies, and I predict it will be at least another 15 years before this genre burns out...temporarily.

 

People are nowhere near burned out? Think again.

 

It was a generalized statement. For the most part, they aren't. The people who are burned out are in the minority.

 

But a growing segment of movie goers.

 

Sure, but there's also an influx.

 

Does the revenue support that theory? I googled briefly and it didn't seem to.

 

It depends on what you're comparing it to. The first X-Men film brought in $54 million on opening weekend, while DOFP brought in $111 million. Within the last 15 years, there's been a MAJOR influx to superhero movies. There's going to be dips on the scale, but there will also be bumps. To me it seems like you're only comparing a few movies that have recently been released, instead of looking at the grand scheme of things. (shrug)

 

Anyways, it doesn't matter, because my original point was that the majority of people still look forward to the next superhero movie. There's no disputing that.

 

Actually there were a few good pages comparing superhero movies over the last 15 years. no matter how many go to the movies it needs to make money. It appears the trend is going the wrong way. A few money pits and we go back to the profitable franchises. Even then the trend seems to be 3 movies, wait 10+ years and then 3 more movies.

 

TDK

Budget: $185,000,000

Gross: $533,316,061

 

AOU

Budget: $250,000,000

Gross: $457,744,064

 

GOTG

Budget: $170,000,000

Gross: $333,130,696

 

Winter Soldier

Budget: $170,000,000

Gross: $259,746,958

 

Granted, those are some of the most successful examples, but that's all it takes for Hollywood to keep pushing out superhero movies, and keep the genre thriving.

 

Btw, there's already been more than a few money pit superhero movies, and we haven't gone back to the "profitable franchises" as you're suggesting.

 

Like I said, there will be dips on the scale (it would be unrealistic to not expect it), and maybe that's why It seems like "the trend is going the wrong way". During those times people get impatient (not necessarily burned out) and it may seem like the genre is nosediving, but all it takes is another smash film to get the naysayers interested again. In the meantime, there's far more people like me who anticipate the next superhero release, and Hollywood knows it. Not to mention that companies like Disney have invested far too much time and money into the franchise to just scrap it in the next few years.

 

I'm not saying that the genre will last as consistently as it has been, but I do think that It will last much longer than what some are suggesting.

 

 

 

 

 

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Disney being invested is as you say a big point. They will keep the characters alive just like they keep the Disney princesses alive and that point can't be overlooked.

 

That said, there will come a time when they make less of them.

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Disney being invested is as you say a big point. They will keep the characters alive just like they keep the Disney princesses alive and that point can't be overlooked.

 

That said, there will come a time when they make less of them.

 

Why? I haven't seen interest in the stories decrease. The comic market has been slowly shrinking due to reading in general tailing off in the face of competition from newer media. I can't tell that interest in superhero stories across all media has tailed off at all for almost a century now, so I'm not sure what would replace them for future generations of kids.

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