MORTAL KOMBAT Reboot from New Line (TBD)
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Mortal Kombat Movie Reboot Gets a Director

 

Variety reports that Simon McQuoid is in talks with New Line to direct Mortal Kombat; McQuoid is a commercial director who has worked on high-profile campaigns for PlayStation, Beats by Dre and Halo. No word yet on what the storyline is, or any other casting news.

 

Director Kevin Tancharoen resurrected the Mortal Kombat movie franchise with his acclaimed 2010 short, Mortal Kombat: Rebirth, which led to a web series, Mortal Kombat: Legacy. Tancharoen was in position to direct his own reboot film, but New Line never backed it; ironic, since Mortal Kombat has since lost a lot of hype, while Tancharoen has only grown in the industry, with he and sister Maurissa bringing heavy influence to projects like Marvel's Agents of SHIELD, and/or the DC CW TV shows.

 

As for Simon McQuoid: he may seem like an unknown being given a massive responsibility, but great directors have come from commercial directing, visual effects work - anywhere in the industry, really. Neil Blomkamp (District 9), Zack Snyder (Justice League) or Tim Miller (Deadpool) are just a couple of examples of movie talent that has evolved out of other sorts of directorial work. New Line perhaps knows something about McQuoid that the rest of the world will see soon enough.

 

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I always liked the fist movie. Never cared for the second one but overall, they're entertaining.

 

And back in the day, Bridgette Wilson was nice to look at :cloud9:

 

Although I suppose she's still very attractive

 

I never pictured you as a guy who likes "fisting" movies. :P

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The Hollywood Reporter did a special few years back about the first film and its success story, despite the odds.

'Mortal Kombat': Untold Story of the Movie That "Kicked the Hell" Out of Everyone

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The film — which broke the video game curse 20 years ago this week — survived broken ribs, bruised kidneys and ridicule from Hollywood: "Everyone was telling me this wouldn't work and my career would be over," recalls producer Larry Kasanoff.

 

Video game movies may be a risky proposition today, but in 1995 they were seen as hopeless. Super Mario Bros. (1993) and Double Dragon (1994) were total bombs — despised by critics and fans alike. The campy Street Fighter (1994) fared better financially but was still years away from earning a cult following on home video.

 

So it was against all odds when Mortal Kombat hit No. 1 in theaters 20 years ago on Aug. 18, 1995. The film grossed $122 million worldwide and broke the video game curse as the first adaptation embraced by fans.

 

Mortal Kombat endured expensive reshoots, broken ribs and screaming executives during its journey from arcade to screen. That journey began when producer Larry Kasanoff was visiting some friends at Midway Games in June 1993. He'd previously worked with James Cameron, turning Terminator 2: Judgment Day (1991) into a merchandising phenomenon worth millions. Among its crowning achievements was the T2 arcade game, a slick rail shooter that broke records for Midway.

 

The guys at Midway showed Kasanoff Mortal Kombat, a new game they said would beat his T2 record. It was bloody, hyper-realistic and already a sensation at the arcade. But Kasanoff believed it was destined to be more than just a video game. He envisioned it as a phenomenon on the order of T2. He saw a TV series, stage shows, albums and movies all in its future. Midway wasn't so sure.

 

Ed Boon, Mortal Kombat co-creator: I remember waking up on a Sunday morning and seeing on CNN, "Mortal Kombat opened at $23.3 million," which was the second-biggest August opening in history, which is huge. It was a big deal.

 

Lauri Apelian, associate producer: None of us had a question in our minds that it would be successful. We were surprised that it stayed at No. 1 for three weeks. I don't think we expected all of that.

 

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