Is it recommend to periodically have books reslabbed?
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Is it recommended that comic books in cgc cases are sent in every so often to have them reslabbed (reholdering) due to the micro chamber paper needing replacement? I saw one person here say that but didn't know if it was necessary or not. 

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5 minutes ago, Mercury Man said:

Do we really know the long term effects of slabs and comics?  CGC has been around since what...2000?   Is it on their website a recommended time if you should re-slab? 

It was brought up in another thread, but I do believe they mention on the website that it is advisable to change the micro chamber paper every ‘x amount’ of years 

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1 hour ago, Nathan81 said:

Is it recommended that comic books in cgc cases are sent in every so often to have them reslabbed (reholdering) due to the micro chamber paper needing replacement? I saw one person here say that but didn't know if it was necessary or not. 

I like to purchase old label(early CGC) books and sometimes deslab them. I have yet to see any obvious deterioration of either the pages or the micro chamber paper. In the early days of CGC, someone made a statement that the MP should last, at least, 7 years. They had not studied anything longer. Some took off with that statement to say it should be changed every 7 years. To me, it's like asking how often should you wash your car. Worry about the environment your comics are stored in. That is much more important than changing the MP.

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The recommendation is 7 years. That number is based on the lifespan of the microchamber paper. After that time period, the microchamber paper becomes inert and no longer works to mitigate the effects of any off-gassing. I'm sure it will continue to protect against any possible ink transfer, however.

If you're OCD about preservation and have the funds, I recommend getting it done.

If you're more rational about preservation, you realize that the book will age better than you will regardless of your decision.

In short, do you HAVE to? The answer is no.

Is it a good idea? Only time, really, will tell.

Is it a bad idea? Not if you have the money.

 

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May main concern was not if the micro paper stops protecting, but if it will actually cause damage if left in too long.

I wonder if someone could request that the micro paper isn't used when submitting books.

Does the acid in paper need oxygen to  turn paper yellow? If so, it seems like it  wouldn't yellow much in a slab anyway.

I agree it would be a good idea not to have books slabbed until selling.

 

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17 hours ago, newshane said:

The recommendation is 7 years. That number is based on the lifespan of the microchamber paper. After that time period, the microchamber paper becomes inert and no longer works to mitigate the effects of any off-gassing. I'm sure it will continue to protect against any possible ink transfer, however.

 

My recollection was the studies at the time did not specify a precise lifespan of the MP. However, they did say 'at least' 7 years.  Again, my recollection, in order to test the lifespan of the MP, they either had to wait out a true length of time or elevate it using heat. So, with 7 years into a length of time test and no degradation, the answer, at the time, was at least 7 years. Think about it, say you are 42 years old and somebody asks you how long do you think you will live. A safe answer would be at least 42 years. So, the safe answer here was 7 years, a number that 'stuck' in the minds of slab collectors to this day.

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I just found a very detailed answer to my question on the main cgc website under the following FAQ. Apparently they are currently saying it's not necessary and that the book can last generations without reholdering. It was recommended earlier on but they've made improvements. 

Is it necessary to get my CGC book reholdered every 10 (or 7, or 12, etc.) years?

  • No. The CGC holder is designed for long-term preservation and provides superior protection for your books. A properly handled and stored CGC-certified book can last for generations.

    The CGC holder is made from high-quality materials and is entirely archival-safe. The inner well that holds books, for example, is comprised of PETG, a plastic that is well known to be archival-safe and extremely clear. This PETG well is placed inside of a durable outer case that is sonically welded to ensure a secure, tamper-evident seal.

    Many comic books, particularly vintage ones, naturally release ("off gas") acidic molecules over time. The CGC holder is therefore designed to not have an air-tight seal, which would otherwise trap these acidic molecules. 

    For added long-term preservation, CGC inserts MicroChamber® paper into vintage books prior to encapsulation. This MicroChamber paper helps to neutralize the natural acidity of some books by using a specialized, proprietary “zeolite” that was designed to absorb and hold the molecules known to damage archival collections. That is why MicroChamber paper is used by many of the world’s most respected museums and institutions, including the Smithsonian Institution, the Getty Conservation Institute, the Louvre, the British Museum and the Northeast Document Conservation Center. 

    When CGC was first established in 2000, we thoroughly researched and implemented the best practices in archival preservation. We took a conservative approach and suggested that customers may wish to consider reholdering their books after approximately seven to ten years so that the MicroChamber paper could be replaced. 

    Today, however, we have the benefit of having graded 4.1 million books over a 17-year period. This is an incredibly large sample size that represents books of all eras, paper types, paper qualities, storage conditions and grades. CGC and its customers now have ample evidence that demonstrates it is not necessary to have your CGC books reholdered simply to replace the MicroChamber paper. CGC’s archival-safe holder, with its combination of features that includes air permeability, MicroChamber paper and a secure, sonic seal, has been shown to provide superior long-term protection for the millions of books that have been encapsulated by CGC. 

    We have never seen a properly stored CGC-certified comic book that needed to be reholdered for archival reasons. Nonetheless, there are still a number of benefits to utilizing CGC’s reholder service, including the crystal-clear display, enhanced aesthetic and durable construction of CGC’s new holder.  

    It is important to remember that proper storage is essential to preserving your books, and collectors should take steps to minimize exposure to heat, humidity, vibration and light. CGC recommends that CGC-certified books be stored in a dark, dry, cool, temperature-controlled location.

    CGC's holders have withstood the test of time and over the last 17 years have been shown to provide outstanding long-term protection and preservation. No other comic book grading services can make that claim.

    MicroChamber® is a registered trademark of Conservation Resources International, Inc.
Edited by Nathan81
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On 10/5/2017 at 4:20 PM, Nathan81 said:

May main concern was not if the micro paper stops protecting, but if it will actually cause damage if left in too long.

I wonder if someone could request that the micro paper isn't used when submitting books.

Does the acid in paper need oxygen to  turn paper yellow? If so, it seems like it  wouldn't yellow much in a slab anyway.

I agree it would be a good idea not to have books slabbed until selling.

 

When microchamber paper is "full" (eg. unable to absorb any more off-gassing from the comic book), it simply becomes inert - it will never harm the actual comic book.

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7 hours ago, mschmidt said:

When microchamber paper is "full" (eg. unable to absorb any more off-gassing from the comic book), it simply becomes inert - it will never harm the actual comic book.

That's good to hear. I thought I read someone saying the micro paper could cause deterioration to adjacent pages, but I don't know if it was experience or conjecture. 

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