Lighting the art room?
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44 posts in this topic

Overhead LEDs?

I don't really know, but it sounds good. :)

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LED Lights: LED lights are best for showcasing valuable artwork. They don’t give off heat, do not emit damaging ultraviolet rays or infrared light. LEDs cost more upfront, but they have a long lifespan and are energy efficient.  

 

Edited by Twanj
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44 minutes ago, Twanj said:

Overhead LEDs?

I don't really know, but it sounds good. :)

 

Thanks, I am not sure either hence my asking. I appreciate the input - looking forward to any more ideas. 

Here are a couple pieces recently framed for the new space. 

 

 

Paul Pelletier Hulk Heart of the monster.jpg

Sal Buscema Hulk corner box.jpg

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Just some ideas, if you were designing the perfect room I'd guess no windows (= no damaging sunlight), humidity control, and LEDs. (if the above that I quoted is true).

I just had some put in my living room (ceiling caved in due to hurricane damage) and they light it up brighter than daylight! It's crazy.

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38 minutes ago, Twanj said:

Just some ideas, if you were designing the perfect room I'd guess no windows (= no damaging sunlight), humidity control, and LEDs. (if the above that I quoted is true).

I just had some put in my living room (ceiling caved in due to hurricane damage) and they light it up brighter than daylight! It's crazy.

No sunlight - check

Humidity control - check

Lighting - figuring out currently

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I swapped out all the lights in any room I have my art in to LED as quick as I could, everything I've read says that any bulbs that are not made to emit UV don't really output any UV at all, vs Incandescent and CFL which can output considerable amounts:

I also found pure white is a bit harsh on the eyes, so i go for a more natural output in the rooms i spend a lot of time in.

https://ledlightinginfo.com/do-led-lights-emit-uv-rays-and-radiation

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If you live in a state with winter, you may want to hang art on interior walls only. Outer walls can shift from hot to cold and cause damage to the paper. A neat idea would be like a gallery wall in the middle of the room that you can hang art on both sides of and walk around. Keep the room pitch black dark when you are not in it. Like others said, run a  dehumidifier somewhere in your house. Try not to have huge flux's in temperature in the room. Keep the art not being displayed in a large sealed bag (keeps out bugs and keeps dry). Here is a pic of my room. I have recess ceiling lighting that can go from high to low intensity. I really like sign holder frames for my art. Easy to swap bagged and boarded art in and out and comes 11x17 horizontal and vertical options. 

DSCN5752.JPG

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5 hours ago, Drewsky said:

If you live in a state with winter, you may want to hang art on interior walls only. Outer walls can shift from hot to cold and cause damage to the paper. A neat idea would be like a gallery wall in the middle of the room that you can hang art on both sides of and walk around. Keep the room pitch black dark when you are not in it. Like others said, run a  dehumidifier somewhere in your house. Try not to have huge flux's in temperature in the room. Keep the art not being displayed in a large sealed bag (keeps out bugs and keeps dry). Here is a pic of my room. I have recess ceiling lighting that can go from high to low intensity. I really like sign holder frames for my art. Easy to swap bagged and boarded art in and out and comes 11x17 horizontal and vertical options. 

DSCN5752.JPG

Thanks for the pic! What are the sign holder frames? More pics of this?

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18 minutes ago, Drewsky said:

image.png.75b7dab07d623eb4e682f9f799dda1e9.pngThey come in horizontal, vertical 11x17 with stick or screw options. Great for bagged and boarded art.'

 

Thanks, this might be a good option for easy interchangeable art of the 11x17 variety. Do you put art in these that is bagged and boarded? Would love to see some closer shots of some of your pieces using these. Thanks again!

 

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7 hours ago, Drewsky said:

If you live in a state with winter, you may want to hang art on interior walls only. Outer walls can shift from hot to cold and cause damage to the paper. A neat idea would be like a gallery wall in the middle of the room that you can hang art on both sides of and walk around. Keep the room pitch black dark when you are not in it. Like others said, run a  dehumidifier somewhere in your house. Try not to have huge flux's in temperature in the room. Keep the art not being displayed in a large sealed bag (keeps out bugs and keeps dry). Here is a pic of my room. I have recess ceiling lighting that can go from high to low intensity. I really like sign holder frames for my art. Easy to swap bagged and boarded art in and out and comes 11x17 horizontal and vertical options. 

DSCN5752.JPG

Not to challenge you, but why the comment about flux's in temperature? Do you have information that confirms that big temperature swings are damaging to paper and materials? I ask because I had this exact question for my restorer (Gordan Christman, one of the better respected comic art restorers), and he couldn't give me any definitive opinion if temperature plays any part in damaging art (unlike direct light, which we ALL agree can be harmful to art, and especially color art using dyes, markers, and other pigments). If you know something about temperature, I'd love to hear about it, as I have art that is sometimes exposed to wider than normal temperature swings.

 

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I live in the desert southwest and was just offered a position in Florida. Humidity is a serious consideration in whether I take this job, not just for me but for my collection of art, animation cels, vintage toys, books, etc. I am terrified of everything developing a waviness due to the shift, but then realize I bought much of this stuff from parts unknown anyway. Dehumidifiers are pretty cheap from what I have seen. But hurricanes are not something I think about here. 

Edited by cstojano
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1 hour ago, stinkininkin said:

Not to challenge you, but why the comment about flux's in temperature? Do you have information that confirms that big temperature swings are damaging to paper and materials? I ask because I had this exact question for my restorer (Gordan Christman, one of the better respected comic art restorers), and he couldn't give me any definitive opinion if temperature plays any part in damaging art (unlike direct light, which we ALL agree can be harmful to art, and especially color art using dyes, markers, and other pigments). If you know something about temperature, I'd love to hear about it, as I have art that is sometimes exposed to wider than normal temperature swings.

 

I'm not 100% on the science, but it's just a moisture/condensation thing. I have heard that there is an idle temp range from like 60-75 degrees. I'm sure most houses fall into a safe range for paper, but keeping art in a storage units, sheds, garages or the like has to be bad and if you took a really cold piece of paper from outside in the winter and brought into a warm house, it may even be moist. Again, I'm not sure, but I always try to be overly cautious with my stuff. I'm sure we have all seen comic art that is wavy and I assume most of that damage was caused from bad framing and being against an exterior wall with temp shift over years. Damage is slow, taking days, months, and years to be visible. Paper yellows/browns in light, moisture builds unless regulated. I am no expert, but I see alot of guys putting their expensive page in direct sunlight or on an exterior wall and I cringe. 

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