Comic with FILE COPY stamped on first page
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17 posts in this topic

On 11/10/2021 at 5:05 PM, SteveOsborne said:

I just purchased Amazing Spider-man 19 at a show and it has the words FILE COPY on the first page to this comic. Does it add value to this comic or does it decrease the value? I have collected for years and have never seen this. Thanks

They only add value if they are high grade, but then again everything high grade goes for a lot of money these days. If your Spider-man 19 is midgrade, then the words file copy won't really change anything.

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On 11/10/2021 at 8:21 PM, William-James88 said:

They only add value if they are high grade, but then again everything high grade goes for a lot of money these days. If your Spider-man 19 is midgrade, then the words file copy won't really change anything.

You might tell that to the folks who spent a fortune buying up Stans low grade file copies.  Or Dave Cockrums, Or Don Rosa's. I've a half dozen SA Marvels marked for Office Use only and I'd ask a hefty premium on them if I were to sell.

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On 11/11/2021 at 8:48 AM, shadroch said:

You might tell that to the folks who spent a fortune buying up Stans low grade file copies.  Or Dave Cockrums, Or Don Rosa's. I've a half dozen SA Marvels marked for Office Use only and I'd ask a hefty premium on them if I were to sell.

The OP has no clue who's file copy it is. Just that it says "file copy" and I answered knowing just that. You are brining another variable that is unrelated to the OPs question.

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On 11/11/2021 at 5:59 PM, PovertyRow said:

This! There is a really weird thing about the so called "file copies". Most of these so-called "file copies" are actually warehouse finds, which is why they tend to be in high grade. Warehouse finds are NOT File Copies!!! File copies are usually more worn than pristine because they are actually removed from the file cabinet, perused by the writers/artists for reference, then returned to the file cabinet. This allows them to maintain continuity, especially when they are producing a story that recalls long past events. Even things like the color of a car could be gleaned from a file copy for a flashback sequence. They can also useful for retconning, so the new continuity makes some modicum of sense when contrasted to the original.

Even the legendary stash of books Bill Gaines copies took home and stored in a closet untouched are not File Copies. One could well call them simply "Gaines Copies" and it would not denigrate them one iota.

I feel the same way about how "File Copy" is used as I do the term "re-glossed". The books were not glossed in the first place so there is nothing to "re"-gloss. Both misnomers but reflective of the increased misunderstanding driven by commercialism that has become prevalent in this wonderful hobby!. 

 

THIS!!!!

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On 11/11/2021 at 5:59 PM, PovertyRow said:

This! There is a really weird thing about the so called "file copies". Most of these so-called "file copies" are actually warehouse finds, which is why they tend to be in high grade. Warehouse finds are NOT File Copies!!! File copies are usually more worn than pristine because they are actually removed from the file cabinet, perused by the writers/artists for reference, then returned to the file cabinet. This allows them to maintain continuity, especially when they are producing a story that recalls long past events. Even things like the color of a car could be gleaned from a file copy for a flashback sequence. They can also useful for retconning, so the new continuity makes some modicum of sense when contrasted to the original.

Even the legendary stash of books Bill Gaines copies took home and stored in a closet untouched are not File Copies. One could well call them simply "Gaines Copies" and it would not denigrate them one iota.

I feel the same way about how "File Copy" is used as I do the term "re-glossed". The books were not glossed in the first place so there is nothing to "re"-gloss. Both misnomers but reflective of the increased misunderstanding driven by commercialism that has become prevalent in this wonderful hobby!. 

 

Would so much more cool if stated "From Gaines' Stash" rather than Gaines File Copy :)

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File copies from most company's were likley often handled. Perhaps less if Gold Key where continuity was virtually non-existent

LittleStooges1cgc.thumb.jpg.e0ac037a314617392f8c8904522c31ee.jpg

Edited by MAR1979
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On 11/21/2021 at 12:01 PM, MAR1979 said:

Would so much more cool if stated "From Gaines' Stash" rather than Gaines File Copy :)

156280909_MadSuperSpecial31-Summer80-1.jpg.abfe8910ff2735cb6fe767364179f07c.jpg

File copies from most company's were likley often handled. Perhaps less if Gold Key where continuity was virtually non-existent

LittleStooges1cgc.thumb.jpg.e0ac037a314617392f8c8904522c31ee.jpg

What you are calling file copies are more accurately called reference copies.  My Marvel books mostly say For Office Use only, which means they circulated around the office or were in the visitor waiting room. I don't consider them file copies although most of the people I bought them from called them that.

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This is one aspect of why comic books are so fascinating, at least to me. We have here different definitions of the term" "file copy". With the concept going back to the Golden Age, most folks who could verify such definitions have long passed away, resulting in some aspects of something as relatively modern as comic books being relegated to "oral history". 

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I recently purchased a couple boxes of TMNTs that I'm now suspecting are file (or personal) copies of Peter Laird's. I picked them up from Steve Lavigne (one of the early artists) who said they were from a longtime friend who wants to remain anonymous. All of the books have identifying stickers on the upper right corners, and some of the writing on stickers have similarities to Laird's handwriting too. Not exactly sure what I can do with this information, but if nothing else, its worth digging into it more.

Does anyone know what evidence CGC would need to confirm file copies to print on the label?

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On 11/21/2021 at 2:44 PM, shadroch said:

Even Overstreet has changed his definition of the term.

It has always been thus with these changes. 30 years ago Sotheby's 1st comic book auction would advertise the name of the restorer (usually Susan Ciccone or Bill Sarill) and what was done. Grades were Poor, Fair, Good, Very Good, Fine, Very Fine and Near Mint. Then came the mixed grades. Good/Very Good could be called Good+ or Very Good- etc. Old price lists sometimes advertised books as Good, Fine or Mint or sometimes just specify "all books Good or better". Tape was tape. Restoration was restoration. Some were so bold as to tell you that you were getting junk restoration with their "Trimmed and re-glossed for that MINT LOOK!". 

Today the hobby is a market. I miss the old daze!

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