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What are the top 5 copies of Action #1???

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When color touch and/or glue is detected by us, it is ALWAYS noted on the label, even if the label is Universal/blue.

 

See above! tongue.gif

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So, Steve---Does it have this mysterious rumored color touch or not?

 

Snyder didnt hit ALL the MH keys he owned, luckily. Ive never heard you or Steve or anyone else "up there" in this hobby EVER allude to anything like this about the MH Action #1 until now ... and even here, this idea is based on an online discussion 4 years ago between a few posters who each heard it second-hand.

 

You know everyone who is everyone......whats the story?

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When color touch and/or glue is detected by us, it is ALWAYS noted on the label, even if the label is Universal/blue.

 

I have to ask. Why would color touch or glue (even minor) not be considered restoration and not yield a purple label?

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I have to ask. Why would color touch or glue (even minor) not be considered restoration and not yield a purple label?

 

It is a Golden Age book, and a GA book with a small amout of restoration can recieve a Universal label. CGC have openly stated this on several occasions.

 

I personally think it is wrong, restoration is restoration, however old the book is. Presumably this is another example of CGC bowing to the dealers/ high rollers, with expensive color touched books. frown.gif (see also label note removal).

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It is a Golden Age book, and a GA book with a small amout of restoration can recieve a Universal label. CGC have openly stated this on several occasions.

 

Well yes, but I still want to know WHY!!!! smile.gif

 

Such a concept is directly opposed to the underlying premises that true restorers try to adhere to. It makes absolutely no sense.

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Id like a definitive answer too. Maybe they USED to give Unib=versal and now purple...or vice versa. It would be really f**=ked if they had no plan.

 

Why did the Adventure #40 Church copy get purple and other high-grade Gold keys get universal plus acolortouch notation on the label?

 

Inquiring minds want to know...big bucks are at stake!

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I would too, give them long enough and they might come up with a credible one.

 

My opinion would be that "a disclaimer on the label" would be the answer. In that case, a disclaimer on label the should be sufficient for any restoration. In fact, if that actually IS CGC's answer, they should use the blue label for restored books and just depend on the notations. Regardless of the book's age, provenance or anything else, restoration is restoration and should be handled as such. Restoration is not defined by extremes of application but simply BY application. If you inpaint 1/8 inch or if you inpaint 4 inches, inpainting has occurred.

 

Now please keep in mind...I am in favor of restoration as long as it is revealed. Especially when the structural integrity of the book has been improved, because it means another copy will survive longer. But to segregate books using colored labels to differentiate those that have had ABC restoration vs those that have had XYZ restoration has no validity.

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My opinion would be that "a disclaimer on the label" would be the answer. In that case, a disclaimer on label the should be sufficient for any restoration. In fact, if that actually IS CGC's answer, they should use the blue label for restored books and just depend on the notations. Regardless of the book's age, provenance or anything else, restoration is restoration and should be handled as such.

 

Whatever they settle on (if they haven't already) it needs to be applied across the board. Having a Purple Restored label for some books and a Blue Universal with notes for others just adds to the confusion that already exists in the restored comic market.

If collectors are ever going to have a wide acceptance of restored books, then CGC have to lead the way with clear, understandable indentification of books from all eras. If collectors (like me) think that some books are getting preferential treatment as far as resto identification goes, then avoidance of these books will continue.

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This will probably be the 4th or 5th time I am posting this on the forum:

 

CGC, since before it's inception, has always stated that, at CGC's discretion, golden age comics with the most minor color touch and/or the most minor glue will be given a blue label but the very minor glue/color touch will ALWAYS be noted on the label. The comic grade will be lowered one step on the grading scale for this because the "work" done to the book is so minor that if removed, it would only change the grade by one step if at all.

The reason CGC decided to do this is that many of the high-grade pedigree Golden-Age comic books have had very minor work done to them and it was always either accepted or ignored by the buyers and sellers of these comic books. CGC could not come into the market and ignore very minor work because CGC is about full disclosure so, to be fair to both buyer and seller alike, we decided to go with the blue label, a one step down grade, and a notation about the work that was done.

 

 

 

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>it means another copy will survive longer

 

you bring up a good point. comics don't survive forever, especially those from the GA that were printed on acidic pulp paper. i was thinking about this after reading the coin thread in the general section.

 

WHEN those GA books start deteriorating beyond the point they are cosmetically appealing and/or recognizable, won't there be a huge speculator dump as they try to acquire money for them while they still can? this would probably kill the values of GA books overnight.

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I'm certainly no paper chemist, but my understanding is that there are so many variables at work that there will not be an obvious threshold when everyone notices that GA books are deteriorating before our eyes. Among the variables--

- humidity

- sunlight

- presence of air

- type of storage container

 

It wouldn't surprise me if some of the current owners of the Edgar Church books have invested in some sort of vacuum sealing mechanism to ward off the effects of age. And at the same time, I believe the market will eventually come to terms with conservation and even professional restoration as a clearly Good Thing.

 

Regards,

Z.

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This forum is a somewhat poor place to post company policy. The reason you have to keep posting answers to common questions is because of the volume of posts in this forum makes it hard to find statement such as you just made; not to mention the fact that the forum software archives and/or deletes messages after 6 to 12 months, not sure of the exact time.

 

The main CGC web site is the best place to post your company policy. If I were you, I'd ask your computer consultants to train 2 or 3 of your employees on how to update the site with small textual additions the next time they're in your office.

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This forum is a somewhat poor place to post company policy. The reason you have to keep posting answers to common questions is because of the volume of posts in this forum makes it hard to find statement such as you just made; not to mention the fact that the forum software archives and/or deletes messages after 6 to 12 months, not sure of the exact time.

 

Or maybe he should just start replying with RTFBOTS!! (Read The Fuc ... er, Friendly smile.gifBack Of The Slab!!!). laugh.giflaugh.gif

 

Al

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The back of the slab doesn't say they only give the Universal nod to Golden age, although it does state they give the unrestored grade to some books with minor glue or CT. When people first hear that, it's controversial; I still find it to be controversial even though I first noticed it almost a year ago when I saw that Action 1 CGC 7.5 with the blue label and minor CT. The back of the slab doesn't explain the thinking behind the decision Steve related above.

 

I used to wholeheartedly disagree with giving Universal to Golden age with tiny CT yet giving the purple top to Silver Ages with tiny CT. I used to think the only reason they did this was to keep the deep pockets happy. Even though this is the most likely reason for the decision, I heard one of the coinees say that NGC does the same thing with coins; some old coins with work done get an unrestored nod whereas newer coins with the same work done do get a restored grade (or whatever the coin slabs call it). I'm still not sure I agree with the policy, but I've got more to think about now that I know that there's a precedent with coins.

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