Has the Purple label created the dislike for restored books?
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Some people are like, "Don't even get that thing near my collection. It has a dab of ct on it, and I despise ct."  But if we lived in a parallel universe where restoration had no effect on the FMV, would people still sing that same song?

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I think the deeper problem is that all the years of negative views on PLODs have hurt the entire marketplace. People hate PLODs, therefore they don't buy them - and a person who doesn't care will pay less, but his window of resale is much smaller. And let's face it, if you're blowing $500+ for a book, you're going to have it in your head that it needs to have potential resale value (should a better copy come up, your focus changes, whatever). Depending on the cost, you may not want to invest in a book with a PLOD knowing that you're not going to be able to unload it as fast as it's blue label counterpart - should the need arise.

I have zero problems with restored books, but I don't buy books for nostalgia. I buy them to collect. I love all my comics, but I can't assume that I will keep them until I'm dead - so I need to buy with resale potential in mind. I think a lot of people fit this category, and the PLODs have - unfortunately - been given a black eye, probably permanently.

Edited by Dr. Balls
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Restoration in the art world is a different creature for two reasons. First, most pieces of traditional artwork are literally unique; sure, prints and such, but each given oil painting, say, exists only as a singular item. Fail to conserve it, and it ceases to be. Second, restoration and conservation in the art world have an established history and are generally done transparently (and especially now, reversibly where possible).

Restoration -- in the PLOD sense -- in the comics world is different. With few exceptions, if you don't like this copy of a book, go chase that copy instead. But much more importantly, the first era of comics restoration wasn't done for conservation; it was done simply to manipulate books into looking better. Almost always without disclosure, and sometimes including outright fraud.

There are problems with CGC's practices regarding the Conserved label, but in principle it's a great idea and important for the future. But that feels different, somehow, to a shady dealer taking a knife to the edge of a book because he'll flip it to an unsuspecting mark for a bigger wad of cash.

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On 11/11/2022 at 6:23 PM, The Lions Den said:

Unfortunately, many restored books simply aren't as appealing to the eye. And since this is a highly visual hobby...well, you know...  (shrug)

So you're saying you only like the pretty ones.  Hmmm...

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Edited by Randall Dowling
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On 11/11/2022 at 11:24 AM, TrevorP24 said:

Question to all the collectors out there.  Maybe this has been hashed out before but couldn't find it.  Point me in the right direction if you know where I should look.

I've been collecting for a long time (before CGC was a thing).  It seems to me, that the utter disdain and devaluing of restored books didn't exist to the same degree before CGC.  Of course, restored books in the same condition as unrestored books have always been less valuable, but they didn't used to be as undesirable as they are now. 

My question is, did that purple label devalue restored comics more than it should have?  People just seem to really hate getting the purple label books (maybe cuz they don't match their other slabbed books?)  I don't mind restored books and sometimes target them to get a good deal.  I personally like how....gulp.... CBCS does it instead.  They label the book restored but don't have a different color label.

For example, I just purchased a Showcase 22 CGC 4.5 restored for about the same price as a 1.0-1.5 goes for.  It has slight color touch, and the top right of the cover is trimmed.  But it looks amazing and I have a book that presents really well for much much cheaper.

Thoughts??? 

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If you're ok with purchasing Restored comics, you are one lucky collector. Think of all the additional opportunities and lower prices available to you. Go get 'em.

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From this relatively new collector, I have mixed feelings.

The stories.  The art.  The history.  And of course, the fun, comradery, and investment potential.

When something is added or taken away from a comic, making it other than original, it can certainly be less appealing.

I don't WANT someone's idea of improving a comic on one of my books.  However, if I really NEED something... well, different story.  And the lower price point can make up for that.

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Greatly appreciate Sharon’s efforts on that Action with Roger’s take being a tad too puritanical. Ranked in order of my ability to abide with- trimming (deal breaker usually), pieces added, color touch, glue, tape. We are caretakers of these rare GA comics so efforts made to preserve and enhance them are alright in my book. Don’t expect to get full price though. 

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On 11/12/2022 at 10:46 AM, Shake N Bake said:

Don't forget, they're comic books :screwy:

Actually they are much much more than that.  They are often historical treasures that were rarely preserved thus owning a special  ‘comic book’ is like finding a time capsule.  To be a true collector is to understand that gems 💎 can indeed be a comic book 📖 and one’s appreciation for history is what binds it to you. 

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Is there a way to gauge the approximate value of Silver & Bronze purple label books as a percentage of the blue label value? 

And what if books are raw? 

I have a couple books in my collection that look like they may have minor color touch.  They are raw.

 

 

 

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The main problem with CGC 'restored labels' is that was the only catch all label right from the start. They lumped in all CONSERVATION done on a book with the restoration term. People would be disappointed with undisclosed restoration on their books, especially trimming, which brought lots of stigma to the purple label, and since CGC didn't really try to follow industry standards at the start to educate or differentiate between work done (at least not in a meaningful, clear visual way) that stigma got applied to any books with proper light conservation done to them. As I understand it Restoration is a subset of Conservation, and like was mentioned earlier are appreciated differently across hobbies. Poster collectors for example seem fine with work done on their old posters since they are meant for visual display first a foremost.

It is better now that there is a CONSERVED label, but the damage has been done and will take years before people in this hobby start to really understand the difference between the work done (we will get there, but I feel CGC hindered the clear understanding of any distinction due to how they handled labels initially)

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