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Milehigh ll

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No, you're mostly right. I was referring to 1960's and up comics, and I do agree that while not rare, there are less DCs than Marvel out there.

 

Then again, most dealers estimate 1 in 4 or 5 Silver Age collections is made up of DC, which when compared to the Marvel troves, is still a lot of comics. Many also state that DC collectors are far more likely to be "true collectors" and guard their books religiously, and don't care that much about valuation.

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I believe the number of high-grade Thor 132s from the MH II find, that I've heard bandied about most often, is approx. 15,000.

 

**A better idea for those remaining 100s of thousands of comics from the Mile High II collection: FREE COMIC BOOK DAY

 

hehe

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How does it help the industry if valued keys are suddenly a dime-a-dozen? See my point? The comics collecting industry is dead if comics are reduced to mere colored pulp with no ascribed value anymore.

 

Artificially creating a shortage by destroying high grade SA/BA keys would probably drive a nail into the SA/BA coffin. The concept is so scandal-worthy that it would make newspapers across the country the same way that The Death Of Superman did. Collectors already know there are stockpiles of these books. It is hardly a secret. But any new would-be investors, on the other hand, would certainly think twice about entering the high grade comics market.

 

Also, consider the diamond market. There is a tremendous surplus of gem quality diamonds. They are parcelled out by the controlling companies at a given rate, always maintaining a balance between supply and demand. This too is general knowledge, but people still pay premium prices for a fairly common gemstone.

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Also, consider the diamond market. There is a tremendous surplus of gem quality diamonds. They are parcelled out by the controlling companies at a given rate, always maintaining a balance between supply and demand. This too is general knowledge, but people still pay premium prices for a fairly common gemstone.

 

Holy [!@#%^&^] ooo.gif, it was kind of funny because I was about to make the same analogy about the diamond market until you mentioned it. DeBeers really is notorious for creating artificial demand. Driving up prices artificially does not help the collector's market in any shape or form. It only benefits the few speculators who hoarded all the issues and created the artificial shortage. It's a disgusting and underhanded way to monopolize a market. Not only that but anyone that destroys books to make them more "rare" is not really a collector at all. A true collector would treasure the book for its age, content, and how it fills a gap in their run more than for its value or uniqueness in the world.

 

If someone is looking for items that are only valued for their "worth" I recommend rare gems or hoarding precious metals/jewelry.

 

 

 

 

 

 

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To scold that such a find would lower the prices on these keys is short-sighted. If suddenly anyone can have them for a song, how does THAT help the industry? Comics values are predicated on the fact that these are in limited supply, which makes buyers and sellers willing to ascribe monetary value to them.

 

Er no.

Comic collecting is a hobby,and true collectors look for and buy the books because they want to own them NOT because of their monetary value. You are speaking from the perspective of a dealer/speculator who would certainly be harmed by an influx of HG material.

Collectors would not, they would be able to get the books they want for less money, which from my POV as a COLLECTOR is a good thing.

 

Of course I was. Read what I write more carefully. I wasn't speaking about MY view on this (I am a hobbyist); I wrote very deliberately that if Chuck really wanted to protect the INDUSTRY, he would get rid of the multiples that would pull down prices. So don't come back around to correct me by pointing out that my comments apply to the industry, and not the hobby. That only suggests that you see my point but don't realize I had made it already.

 

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DeBeers really is notorious for creating artificial demand. Driving up prices artificially does not help the collector's market in any shape or form. It only benefits the few speculators who hoarded all the issues and created the artificial shortage.

 

A tough situation any way you look at it. We know about the Supply side, in the sense that we know there are, pardon the pun, hordes out there. But the condition is definitely going to be a factor. After this many years, the number if ultra-high grade books are definitly fewer, and this is where the 9.8+ range is going to tell. I can see books like this settling into their own "market" with the majority, while higher grade, going for considwerably less than the 9.8+ books. Kind of a microcosm of what we are seeing now as the census continues to update.

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