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Will Hulk #181 keep increasing in value?

Will Hulk #181 continue to increase in value or is this as big as the bubble gets and you need to sell?  

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  1. 1. Will Hulk #181 continue to increase in value or is this as big as the bubble gets and you need to sell?

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Why do you have such a hard-on for Hulk 181 and it's potential resale values? Holding a stack and want to make sure it's thought of as "rare"?

 

Yup, I have tons of copies and I am trying to get a feel for what I should do with them JC. Actually, I just like looking at how polls on the same subject can come up with interesting results. Like:

 

1)Most people think there are 10,000+ copies in one poll

 

2)Most people don't know anyone with 10+ copies in another poll

 

3)Most people think Hulk #181 has reached its peak value in a 3rd poll

 

If polls 1 and 3 are correct then logic would suggest someone with a large stash should be selling a lot of them.

 

Poll 2 seems to go against the results of 1 and 3 in my opinion. There are 10,000+ copies out there, but almost no one knows anyone with any collection of 10+.

 

I just find it interesting. Nothing more. Just interesting.

 

Plus who doesn't like speculating on Hulk #181? gossip.gifinsane.gifpopcorn.gif

 

 

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If polls 1 and 3 are correct then logic would suggest someone with a large stash should be selling a lot of them.

 

And if wishes were fishes...

 

As others have stated, the day you WILL see a big rush is when Hulk 181 CGC copies start falling in value. Until then, it's like a super-performing stock and one that many are satisfied to hold, especially the rich BSD collectors.

 

And like I said before, you SERIOUSLY overestimate the importance of even 100 Hulk 181 9.4's when compared to a high-grade GA key. Or think about a CGC 9.4 Hulk 181 compared to a single AF 15 CGC 9.4. Not even in the same Zip Code. If a serious collector is tossing around hundreds of thousands on GA and SA keys, why in the world would he care about those copies of Hulk 181 he's got stashed away?

 

$3K per issue may seem like a lot of money to some, but it's not, especially in the world of CGC GA and SA keys.

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As others have stated, the day you WILL see a big rush is when Hulk 181 CGC copies start falling in value. Until then, it's like a super-performing stock and one that many are satisfied to hold, especially the rich BSD collectors.

 

BSD???

 

And like I said before, you SERIOUSLY overestimate the importance of even 100 Hulk 181 9.4's when compared to a high-grade GA key.

 

Would never compare it to GA key. With 170+ CGC 9.4s Hulk 181 will never be as rare as any GA key.

 

Or think about a CGC 9.4 Hulk 181 compared to a single AF 15 CGC 9.4.

 

Wouldn't compare it to AF 15 either for the same reason mentioned above. However, there is NOTHING like Hulk 181 in the BA except "maybe" ASM 129, but the usual suspects that we all know of like TOD# 1, 10, WWbyNight 32, IM 55, MSpotlight 5, MPremiere 15, ASM 121, 122, 136, MFeature 1 etc... have potential.

 

Not even in the same Zip Code. If a serious collector is tossing around hundreds of thousands on GA and SA keys, why in the world would he care about those copies of Hulk 181 he's got stashed away?

 

Short answer is he wouldn't. However, I don't think there are a whole lot of these rich collectors with huge stashes of Hulk 181s. I don't know any positively. Just rumors. Odds are there are a few with some stashes like the people you suggested in other posts, but not so many that would amount to anywhere close to 10,000+ copies.

 

 

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Odds are there are a few with some stashes like the people you suggested in other posts, but not so many that would amount to anywhere close to 10,000+ copies.

 

So you keep saying, but in the immortal words of Kurt Russell in The Thing, "Why don’t we just stay here a little while, and see what happens?"

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As others have stated, the day you WILL see a big rush is when Hulk 181 CGC copies start falling in value. Until then, it's like a super-performing stock and one that many are satisfied to hold, especially the rich BSD collectors.

 

JC - I don't think that's true. If I had a stash of even 10 cgc 9.4s I would be letting them go one every 6 weeks for the last year and furthermore had a few of the books out on consignment so as to not create the impression that I had a stash.

 

A rich BSD collector would hopefully understand the impact on prices that a "big rush" would cause . . . 893scratchchin-thumb.gif

 

DAM

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Bronze-Age keys (like the Hulk 181) in NM- and higher grade will be the best gainers in the next few years. Will we see a doubling of value for keys like Hulk 181, X-Men 94, and GS X-Men 1 like we did in 2000 again? Maybe, but not for some time. Despite the countervailing theories about which books to invest/avoid, if you are looking to drop some cash on a copy, and you feel fairly comfortable in your grading skills, buy 'em up raw and keep them, or sell 'em slabbed. You can make a good go as a spec, or as a collector, either way.

 

And this theory that there is a duality between the spec and the collector -- its a farce. There is no duality. They are one and the same person. Everyone who considers themselves a half-[!@#%^&^] collector will ALWAYS be a speculator. The reasons; on the one hand to measure your risk tolerance, or to budget for a gap in your run; and on the other, to subsidize your purchases with the sale of books from your own collection. Unless you are independently wealthy, or you want to purchase blindly, you will always need to be aprised of market trends and the performances of certain titles to protect your collecting interest/investment returns. Do what you must, and let the naysayers turn blue to the face telling you the odds are not in your favour, but they too will realize they were wrong, and their childrens children -- the incorruptable judge -- will reveal the ways in which they have lied.

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And this theory that there is a duality between the spec and the collector -- its a farce. There is no duality. They are one and the same person. Everyone who considers themselves a half-[!@#%^&^] collector will ALWAYS be a speculator.

 

Wow, thanks for the blanket categorization. I may be alone, but I don't buy my books with resale value in mind. I look for comics I need for my collection, at a given condition, and then pick a price I'm comfortable with no matter what (ie. crash tomorrow) and start tracking. I have absolutely no clue what my collection is worth and couldn't care less.

 

You may worry over resale price, return on investment, etc., but I learned a long time ago that comic book investing during a hype period is purely an oxymoron.

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I have absolutely no clue what my collection is worth and couldn't care less.

 

So how, pray tell, would you have arrived at a value for these? The old dartboard method?

 

I can see it now...

 

Interested Party replying to post: So how much is the lot worth?

 

joe_collector: Oh, I don't know. If you want to know what they're worth, you can research that information on eBay, or the comic price guides.

 

Interested Party replying to post: Yes, I realize this, but how much would you like for the books you are selling?

 

joe_collector: I don't have a clue what they're worth.

 

Interested Party replying to post: Can I come and take a look at them; maybe I can tell you what they're worth!

 

joe_collector: Hell no! Way too much trouble. Like I said, I don't have a clue what they're worth, and quite frankly... I don't care much for the money. You can have 'em... that is of course if I can find 'em -- truth is, I don't even know where they are...

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I have absolutely no clue what my collection is worth and couldn't care less.

 

So how, pray tell, would you have arrived at a value for these? The old dartboard method?

 

I can see it now...

 

Interested Party replying to post: So how much is the lot worth?

 

joe_collector: Oh, I don't know. If you want to know what they're worth, you can research that information on eBay, or the comic price guides.

 

Interested Party replying to post: Yes, I realize this, but how much would you like for the books you are selling?

 

joe_collector: I don't have a clue what they're worth.

 

Interested Party replying to post: Can I come and take a look at them; maybe I can tell you what they're worth!

 

joe_collector: Hell no! Way too much trouble. Like I said, I don't have a clue what they're worth, and quite frankly... I don't care much for the money. You can have 'em... that is of course if I can find 'em -- truth is, I don't even know where they are...

 

sign-funnypost.gifsign-funnypost.gifsign-funnypost.gif For something to be funny it has to have some truth to it. popcorn.gif

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I have absolutely no clue what my collection is worth and couldn't care less.

 

So how, pray tell, would you have arrived at a value for these? The old dartboard method?

 

I have to admit, I feel like I'm talking to a bunch of kids on here. How do you think free market/auction values are detemined, especially for something as functionally worthless as comics?

 

Interested parties make offers and the highest one is accepted. These offers are based on a wide range of factors, the least of which is a number in the Overstreet Guide. It's pretty easy to understand, and when you try and make it seem that we all need to track our books constantly via OS, it makes me laugh.. seriously.

 

I have no idea on how much my collection is worth, nor its exact composition, and when I do sell books, I either ask for open offers on here (buyer decides) or start 'em off at $1.99 on EBay. I may have an idea on what I personally would like to see as a price (which has absolutely nothing to do with OS), but I let the market decide, as do a great many sellers.

 

I buy the same way, and use my "internal valuator" (and my Paypal balance grin.gif) to decide what I'm willing to fork over for the comics. The day I let someone else enforce their rules on my personal valuation is the day they put me in a pine box.

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I have no idea on how much my collection is worth, nor its exact composition, and when I do sell books, I either ask for open offers on here (buyer decides) or start 'em off at $1.99 on EBay. I may have an idea on what I personally would like to see as a price (which has absolutely nothing to do with OS), but I let the market decide, as do a great many sellers.

 

No idea?? Do you suffer from long and short term memory loss? Forget how much you bought your comics for or even reading any number of threads in these forums? Let me help you out. That box of 300 NM Hulk #181s you have been hoarding are worthless. Sell them to me immediately for $1 a piece. insane.gif

 

As to Overstreet and other price guides aren't they based on the market? I seem to recall reading about 50 market reports located in the front of the book. Doesn't OS also have a section that shows how much CGC and raw comics have sold for in the past year? Seems to me if a person was going to sell or just wanted a good estimate of how valuable his collection was OS would be a good source to get that info. Might not be as accurate as current ebay sells on individual comics, but it would definitely be in the ballpark for an entire collection.

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No idea?? Do you suffer from long and short term memory loss?

 

You have absolutely no idea of the hoardes of Bronze comics I have. Just for an example, I'm out of room in the basement storage and now have 10+ boxes stacked in my office. blush.gif

 

I'd be surprised (assuming they don't have it on Comicbase or similar) if the bigtime collectors on here (with troves that dwarf mine by a mile) could give a close estimate as to their collection's book value.

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I have to admit, I feel like I'm talking to a bunch of kids on here. How do you think free market/auction values are detemined, especially for something as functionally worthless as comics?

 

Imagine how this seller would feel about your criticism re: his BIN price ; this after claiming on this thread you have no concept of comic values?!?! And if "comics are functionally worthless," then maybe you should consider adopting that as your sig line the next time you offer up books from your collection. It just might bolster some more offers if people know who they're dealing with ahead of time. laugh.gif

 

Interested parties make offers and the highest one is accepted. These offers are based on a wide range of factors, the least of which is a number in the Overstreet Guide. It's pretty easy to understand, and when you try and make it seem that we all need to track our books constantly via OS, it makes me laugh.. seriously.

 

In the example I cited, you were taking private offers; I just don't see how you are able to sell something without knowing its worth, using that method of selling. And don't feed me this jive about taking the best offer; I can't speak about your Mr Generosity side, but I've seen firsthand on these boards your haggling abilities (most recently -- Luke Cage books Mike had offered in the CGC Marketplace). Prudence is not a birthright; it is determined by ones actions. Quite frankly, you don't appear to me as a person who wouldn't research their stuff before dealing with anything, let alone, an item with some kind of determined monetary value.

 

I have no idea on how much my collection is worth, nor its exact composition, and when I do sell books, I either ask for open offers on here (buyer decides) or start 'em off at $1.99 on EBay. I may have an idea on what I personally would like to see as a price (which has absolutely nothing to do with OS), but I let the market decide, as do a great many sellers.

 

I don't remember who said this exactly, but a well known local dealer once told me there is a fine line between a private collector and a dealer. Like the dealer, the private collector must realize at some point that to satisfy his collecting interests, s/he would need to part with something from their collection they no longer want to hang on to. The main difference from the collector to the dealer is that the dealer doesn't easily confuse interest with monetary necessity. There are plenty of people who don't track the values of their collections. I am one of them. And I know a few dealers who can be accused of this as well.

 

The dictionary definition for speculation : To engage in the buying or selling of a commodity with an element of risk on the chance of profit.

 

Going back to my initial claims, specifically regarding your charge that I was somehow blanketing all collectors with my previous claim; you have made it perfectly clear on these boards that you are looking to fill your run of Byrne X-Men. You may not realize this, but everytime you engage yourself in the act of searching, and comparing the values of a NM 9.4 X-Men (Byrne run), the mere act of conducting searches on eBay for the best prices based on past yields, and basing your determination to purchase on comparitive value performance -- YOU MAY WANT TO SIT DOWN FOR THIS -- you are actually engaging in speculative pursuits. Part of the proof that you do have some concept of their (Byrne X-Men) value can be found in the comment you made on the X-Men lot in the Marketplace section of this forum, and to deny any of this is to admit you are a hypocrite.

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Yeah, and the reason I get the boyz at Blockbuster to hold me back their upcoming $9.99 and $7.99 previously-viewed DVDs is because I'm "speculating" on the used DVD market. 27_laughing.gif

 

I buy what I like and pay what I feel is commensurate with the inherent value. It's the same in all my entertainment pursuits, and that's one reason why you won't see me gong crazy and laying $5K down on a Bronze CGC 9.8.

 

I treat my comics buying as fun, and that's why I'm buying CGC copies of Byrne X-Men when I have a few boxes full of raw HG copies. It's enjoyable to buy them, nothing more, nothing less.

 

If that's speculation, then in addition to speculating in DVDs, I do the same with PC games, CDs and novels.

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I treat my comics buying as fun, and that's why I'm buying CGC copies of Byrne X-Men when I have a few boxes full of raw HG copies. It's enjoyable to buy them, nothing more, nothing less.

 

If you were buying comics for fun why would you be looking for multiple HG copies of Byrne X-men if you weren't actually going to sell at some point? Why not just buy 1 low-mid grade copy to read? Why buy HG for any reason if you aren't speculating that they are more valuable and will continue to rise in value? makepoint.gif Plus, what is the purpose of buying more than 1 copy of any comic if you aren't speculating? Now give up the Hulk #181s in HG so the rest of us poor slobs can have some. grin.gif It isn't like you can read more than one copy at a time and one cover looks the same as the next. I don't think your actions match your words in this case.

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If you were buying comics for fun why would you be looking for multiple HG copies of Byrne X-men if you weren't actually going to sell at some point? Why not just buy 1 low-mid grade copy to read? Why buy HG for any reason if you aren't speculating that they are more valuable and will continue to rise in value?

 

It's becoming obvious you cannot separate "investment value" from "comic collecting", and it's always gonna be about the greenbacks. I guarantee comic values will fall across the board in the coming years; it's a preordained fate, due to the demographics, so there's no way I'm "speculating" on any comic.

 

I'm just a Byrne fanatic for his 70's Marvels, much the way some 60's guys are Neal Adams addicts.

 

In terms of cash outlay, I actually feel quite foolish for putting even the small amount of money I do into comic collecting, but I pass it off as sunk entertainment costs. It's my hobby and as such, I can spare a bit of "fun money" to buy some comics.

 

But "investing in comics" during one of the most insane price spikes in history? Come on! That's a fool's game and it always has been.

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