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Reslabbing your CGC comics every 7 years

Did you know that your CGC comic should be reslabbed every 7 years so the microchamber paper can be replaced?  

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  1. 1. Did you know that your CGC comic should be reslabbed every 7 years so the microchamber paper can be replaced?

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Who knew they were going to have to spend money to reslab all their CGC comics every 7 years before they purchased their 1st CGC comic or sent their 1st raw comics to be slabbed? I am just curious. I didn't know until I went through some old Ask CGC threads. Less than 3 years before the 1st CGC graded comics are due for re-slabbing.

 

 

 

 

 

 

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I'm far less concerned with the money, compared to the potential for CGC to arbitrarily lower the grade (upon reslab) for case-related damage. I know it's right that the CGC Number should reflect the book's "current grade", but it's still pretty scary.

 

Check out that Hulk 181 CGC 9.8 on Heritage. It's got a nice case crack, and just imagine sending that puppy in for reslab and getting a 9.4 or 9.6 in return. 893whatthe.gif

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I'm far less concerned with the money, compared to the potential for CGC to arbitrarily lower the grade (upon reslab) for case-related damage. I know it's right that the CGC Number should reflect the book's "current grade", but it's still pretty scary.

 

Check out that Hulk 181 CGC 9.8 on Heritage. It's got a nice case crack, and just imagine sending that puppy in for reslab and getting a 9.4 or 9.6 in return. 893whatthe.gif

 

Very true. The more a comic is handled, the more it could be damaged. I personally used CGC to avoid having to re-bag everything every 5 years or so. Kind of defeats my purpose of having my comics CGC'd now. It is going to be interesting to see what happens after 7 years. I know lots of people will not get their comics re-slabbed either because they don't know they are suppose to or they just don't want to spend the money. How much damage can dirty microchamber paper do if left in a comic?

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At some point in the next few years someone(are you reading this POV) will have to do some testing and find out if outdated micro-chambers become inert or are harmful to the books.Right now it is just speculation.

 

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What's the difference between not even having micro-chamber paper, and leaving the same piece of micro-chamber paper in their indefinitely? confused-smiley-013.gif

 

Do people insert pieces of micro-chamber paper between the pages and covers of their raw books? Did they do it before CGC? I never heard of the concept of inserting micro-chamber paper in your books until CGC started doing it...

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What's the difference between not even having micro-chamber paper, and leaving the same piece of micro-chamber paper in their indefinitely? confused-smiley-013.gif

 

I'm no expert on micro-chamber paper, but the last time we brought this out, the potential issues revolved around the paper absorbing contaminants, and over time, the paper and contaminant build-up becoming hazardous the comic. So if you didn't add the paper, you wouldn't get the benefits, but you also don't incur potential negatives either.

 

But in the end, who really knows? I guess we'll all find out in 7-10 years....

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What's the difference between not even having micro-chamber paper, and leaving the same piece of micro-chamber paper in their indefinitely? confused-smiley-013.gif

 

I'm no expert on micro-chamber paper, but the last time we brought this out, the potential issues revolved around the paper absorbing contaminants, and over time, the paper and contaminant build-up becoming hazardous the comic. So if you didn't add the paper, you wouldn't get the benefits, but you also don't incur potential negatives either.

 

But in the end, who really knows? I guess we'll all find out in 7-10 years....

 

According to the manufacturer (one of them) who posted here some months back, there is no buildup or release of hazardous contaminants. Once the micro-chamber paper stops neutralizing acids it just becomes another piece of paper, so to speak, with no reversion to the acidic.

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What's the difference between not even having micro-chamber paper, and leaving the same piece of micro-chamber paper in their indefinitely? confused-smiley-013.gif

 

I'm no expert on micro-chamber paper, but the last time we brought this out, the potential issues revolved around the paper absorbing contaminants, and over time, the paper and contaminant build-up becoming hazardous the comic. So if you didn't add the paper, you wouldn't get the benefits, but you also don't incur potential negatives either.

 

But in the end, who really knows? I guess we'll all find out in 7-10 years....

 

According to the manufacturer (one of them) who posted here some months back, there is no buildup or release of hazardous contaminants. Once the micro-chamber paper stops neutralizing acids it just becomes another piece of paper, so to speak, with no reversion to the acidic.

 

So why re-slab after 7 years??? I mean if that is the case there would be no reason to re-slab, correct?

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If the micro chamber paper stops neutralising the acids then the pages can start to deteriorate.

 

If acids build up over time then why was there a Thor #156 or 158 that received a CGC grade of 10.0? It wasn't protected all those years from the elements with micro-chamber paper. It was stored in a warehouse sandwiched between a bunch of other comics.

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So basically, the microchamber puts the brakes on the paper deterioration for about 7 years by neutralizing/absorbing the acids released by the comic book paper, and once it's buffering capacity is used up it's business as usual with the paper starting to deteriorate once again. Seems to me the only acids being neutralized/absorbed are those released in the immediate vicinity of the microchamber paper (from the covers and/or the 1st/last pages of the book).

 

I can almost guarantee you that the buffering/neutralizing capacity of full-backs/half-backs blows away whatever capacity is in the microchamber paper...hmmm? 893scratchchin-thumb.gif

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If the micro chamber paper stops neutralising the acids then the pages can start to deteriorate.

 

If acids build up over time then why was there a Thor #156 or 158 that received a CGC grade of 10.0? It wasn't protected all those years from the elements with micro-chamber paper. It was stored in a warehouse sandwiched between a bunch of other comics.

 

I said can start......as for the Thor, its' perfect? nature means that a whole bunch of storage elements came into play to ensure its' protection.

 

But to support deterioration.....what is the percentage of GA and SA books that are true WHITE.

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So basically, the microchamber puts the brakes on the paper deterioration for about 7 years by neutralizing/absorbing the acids released by the comic book paper, and once it's buffering capacity is used up it's business as usual with the paper starting to deteriorate once again. Seems to me the only acids being neutralized/absorbed are those released in the immediate vicinity of the microchamber paper (from the covers and/or the 1st/last pages of the book).

 

I can almost guarantee you that the buffering/neutralizing capacity of full-backs/half-backs blows away whatever capacity is in the microchamber paper...hmmm? 893scratchchin-thumb.gif

 

A lot of it has to do with storage.....regardless of whether something is protected by hard plastic if you stick it in the open or put it in your damp cellar then [!@#%^&^] is going to happen to it. Generally with rust and foxing the damage starts at the back or the front not the middle. So the greater need of protection is in those areas.

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Definitely interesting. I hope CGC will expound on this and communicate to their customers about this. I have 4 CGC books being "reholdered" now and I fear that I will get back a different (read:worse) grade than when I turned it in.

 

Grrrr.....I'm getting angry. Must control.... anger.....RRRRAAAOOOORRRR!

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Definitely interesting. I hope CGC will expound on this and communicate to their customers about this. I have 4 CGC books being "reholdered" now and I fear that I will get back a different (read:worse) grade than when I turned it in.

 

Grrrr.....I'm getting angry. Must control.... anger.....RRRRAAAOOOORRRR!

 

I thought the grade remains unaffected during re-holdering..... confused.gif

 

If you don't mind me asking......why are you having books re-holdered? confused-smiley-013.gif

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I just patrolled the "Ask CGC" forum on ths board. If there are cracks in the holder, they reserve the right to change the grade. If there are no defects in the holder you are correct that the grade should remain the same.

 

On 3 of the 4 books that I am reholding, there are just corner cracks that don't impact the book. The 4th book (graded at 9.6), has a crack up and down the entire back of the holder. It doesn't look like it affected the book, but there's that outside chance.

 

As of now, I reholder only if there are cracks or if I plan resale. The "7 year" rule will mean some of my books will need to be reholdered in three years or so.

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