I Am Providence: The H.P. Lovecraft Thread
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238 posts in this topic

1 hour ago, OtherEric said:

June 1936 Astounding, with the first publication of "The Shadow Out of Time".  This is the first Lovecraft pulp I ever owned, my favorite Lovecraft story, and possibly my all-time favorite pulp cover, to the point where I had it made into a t-shirt.  What's not to love about a cover that features Lovecraftian monstrosities who are also librarians?

Astounding_1936_06.jpg

I bet any artist who got an assignment to illustrate a Lovecraft story must have been like, "Oh No!" I think I would have been tempted to just put them in shadow and show the horrific responses of those who came into contact with them!

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I have a Penguin HP Lovecraft collection which has one of the best cover illustrations of the creatures from The Shadow over Innsmouth. Seriously creepy. I read that last year and it was truly frightening!

Edited by 50YrsCollctngCmcs
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2 hours ago, 50YrsCollctngCmcs said:

I have a Penguin HP Lovecraft collection which has one of the best cover illustrations of the creatures from The Shadow over Innsmouth. Seriously creepy. I read that last year and it was truly frightening!

Shadow is one of my favorite of his longer works, and I enjoy the new stories written within the framework he set forth (Shadows, Weird Shadows, etc)

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Just now, IngelsFan said:

Shadow is one of my favorite of his longer works, and I enjoy the new stories written within the framework he set forth (Shadows, Weird Shadows, etc)

I love The Shadow over Innsmouth.  Maybe it's the unusual, for Lovecraft, chase and action scenes. 

I have those sequel books from F&B, but I've only read a couple of stories so far.  Need to dig in!

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A sad item today:  the October 1936 issue of Weird Tales, which has a letter from Lovecraft remembering Robert E. Howard.  Lovecraft himself would pass away about half a year later.

I'm including a scan of the page with the letter that I found online as well as the cover; the book itself is mine:

Weird_Tales_1936_10_temp.jpg

378.jpg

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One of the interesting things about reading Lovecraft is his descriptions of the small towns and hamlets in New England where a variety of his stories take place. It was clear he had done a fair bit of traveling throughout the area. As a kid we vacationed there quite a bit and in recent years we have made a number of summer vacations there with our own children. While I never found it particularly eerie I've also never been there in the dead of winter when the night must close in fast in the hills. Driving the local byways though one does marvel at some of the isolated homesteads so one's active mind could start to imagine things. Additionally, the town of Portsmouth in New Hampshire on the Maine border is really quite interesting and could easily have been transported from England itself.

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And now we have the last story Lovecraft ever wrote, although not the last published, or even the last published in his lifetime.  "The Haunter of the Dark" in the December 1936 Weird Tales.

Just for fun,I'm throwing in the cover of the Marvel Comics adaptation of the story as well:

 

Weird_Tales_1936_12.jpg

Journey_into_mystery_4_bronze.jpg

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On 4/30/2021 at 4:07 PM, RedFury said:

Here's a book from Lovecraft's personal library, with his name and address written inside the front cover in his own hand.  The book is The Works of Virgil, and is mentioned in his letters. 

eEvWhDel.jpg OZAkAIKl.jpg

78hpMNWh.jpg

 

This is just so amazing to have. I am in awe.

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On 5/3/2021 at 11:31 PM, IngelsFan said:

Shadow is one of my favorite of his longer works, and I enjoy the new stories written within the framework he set forth (Shadows, Weird Shadows, etc)

This is my favorite Lovecraft story, but without the short blurb at the end. I wished it had ended with

Spoiler

the escape from Innsmouth without the transformation. Why the danger if he was really one of the gang? It just changes the perspective for me and alters what I like about the story. 

Does anyone know if that part was added at the request of the publisher, or something of that nature?

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9 hours ago, OtherEric said:

And now we have the last story Lovecraft ever wrote, although not the last published, or even the last published in his lifetime.  "The Haunter of the Dark" in the December 1936 Weird Tales.

Just for fun,I'm throwing in the cover of the Marvel Comics adaptation of the story as well:

 

Weird_Tales_1936_12.jpg

Journey_into_mystery_4_bronze.jpg

That Marvel 2nd series, along with Conan comics, is what led me to Lovecraft, Howard and the whole Weird Tales circle. The 1st five issues have original stories by Howard, Bloch and Lovecraft. Sleepers still.

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12 hours ago, 50YrsCollctngCmcs said:

So where does this story fall in the "Last of the Lovecrafts"? So proudly pitched on the cover!!

814111083_WeirdTales.thumb.jpg.8d097f52c8b72bb80e8dfbe962c89f34.jpg

"Last of the Lovecrafts" is technically wrong... there are eight stories entirely by Lovecraft that were published after "The Case of Charles Dexter Ward".  But, with one exception, they were extremely minor works- four pieces of juvenilia, "Sweet Ermengarde", "The Transition of Juan Romero", and "Old Bugs".  The only major story by Lovecraft after this was "The Dream-Quest of Unknown Kadath".  This is the last new story by Lovecraft in Weird Tales.

I vaguely recall reading something where they said they thought the manuscript for Kadath was lost or incomplete and they didn't expect to find it, but I couldn't find the reference while skimming through Weird Tales from around this time.

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9 hours ago, OtherEric said:

January 1937 Weird Tales.  This issue actually has two Lovecraft stories.  There's "The Thing on the Doorstep" by Lovecraft himself, and a revision "The Disinterment" with Duane W. Rimel.  This is one of the revisions where the credited writer actually did a lot of the work, unlike most where Lovecraft was essentially the ghostwriter. 

Weird_Tales_1937_01.jpg

I really need one of these. One of my favorite covers of 1937 but doesn't seem to show up as often as the others.

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1 hour ago, Surfing Alien said:

I really need one of these. One of my favorite covers of 1937 but doesn't seem to show up as often as the others.

I don't recall exactly what I paid for my copy... but I do remember I paid a bit more than I usually do for Weird Tales from around then, because I just couldn't find a copy cheaper.  While I'm missing lots of issues with Lovecraft poems or reprints, I do have every WT from October 1931 up with the first publication anywhere of a Lovecraft story.  I think this was the last one I needed from 1933 or later.

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Thanks for posting all these awesome books and the history lesson!

Discovered Lovecraft in junior high and have the Ballantine reprints, but these original pulps are just too cool!

-bc

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July 1937 Weird Tales, with a poem by Lovecraft: "To Virgil Finlay, Upon his Drawing for Robert Bloch's Tale, "The Faceless God""

I'm including the poem and the drawing for reference; both taken from scans found online.  I don't actually have the issue where the illustration first appeared.

Weird_Tales_1937_07.jpg

faceless god.jpg

faceless god poem.jpg

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