THE BATMAN spoilers thread
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So 'Vengence' realizing he was inspiring some with his violence leading to him becoming The Batman was a sharp character growth approach. Being Year Two it made sense to me he now came to realize he can inspire others through his actions.

Liked also in the end the Wayne Family and even Alfred were not dirty like the trailers may have you assume. It was all the manipulation of Carmine Falconer - the ultimate rat.

Anyone catch the 1966 bust as a nod to the TV show? Even that was inserted to celebrate Batman history.

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DEN OF GEEKS: The Batman Ending Explained

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The Joker Gets the Last Laugh


While Bruce’s choice to stay is the ending, there is also what amounts to a glorified post-credits scene slipped in before the final cut to black: our introduction to Barry Keoghan’s the Joker. In another move taken from Nolan’s playbook, the first entry in this rebooted universe includes a tease in its closing moments to the Clown Prince of Crime.

 

And in the case of The Batman, we get a kind of good look at him through a prison door. Unlike Ledger’s Joker in The Dark Knight, it appears Keoghan’s big bad is fully formed before ever meeting Batman. He’s already in Arkham Asylum and has a face that appears to be disfigured by more than a chemical bath.

When our editor-in-chief Mike Cecchini spoke with Matt Reeves last month, the director confirmed that the Joker was disfigured from birth in a change that echoes Gothic horror and German Expressionism that influenced the creation of the Joker: Paul Leni and Conrad Veidt’s 1928 silent classic, The Man Who Laughs.

 

“The idea is that what you’re seeing is a pre-Joker, Joker actually,” Reeves tells us. “So it will be critical that he be different. And for me, I was working with Mike Marino who did Colin’s makeup, and he did Barry [Keoghan]’s makeup as well. The conception that I wanted was that we’d go back to the Conrad Veidt, The Man Who Laughs inspiration, which is the Bob Kane, Bill Finger reference [for the character]. And in that, obviously that guy has a congenital disease. He’s like the Phantom of the Opera, he can’t not smile. So I was like, ‘wouldn’t it be interesting if this origin was not like, you know, a vat of chemicals or some unexplained sort of scars like the Nolan Joker?’ What if we did something where he had a congenital disease?’”

 

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On 3/4/2022 at 5:48 AM, Bosco685 said:

So 'Vengence' realizing he was inspiring some with his violence leading to him becoming The Batman was a sharp character growth approach. Being Year Two it made sense to me he now came to realize he can inspire others through his actions.

Liked also in the end the Wayne Family and even Alfred were not dirty like the trailers may have you assume. It was all the manipulation of Carmine Falconer - the ultimate rat.

Anyone catch the 1966 bust as a nod to the TV show? Even that was inserted to celebrate Batman history.

I didn't catch that. The only easter egg I caught was the Hush reference.

Questions, so Batman doesn't live in a manor but in a tower right?

Also, can someone please help me understand what they missed with the spanish in El Ratta Allada? Like why the Penguin was making fun of them for missing something?

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On 3/4/2022 at 8:59 AM, William-James88 said:

I didn't catch that. The only easter egg I caught was the Hush reference.

Questions, so Batman doesn't live in a manor but in a tower right?

Also, can someone please help me understand what they missed with the spanish in El Ratta Allada? Like why the Penguin was making fun of them for missing something?

THE RIDDLER’S SPANISH RIDDLE “EL RATA ALADA” IN THE BATMAN EXPLAINED

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THE RIDDLER’S SPANISH RIDDLE “EL RATA ALADA”


The Riddler’s Spanish riddle “El Rata Alada” translates to “the winged rat”, and provides a clue to who The Batman and Jim Gordon should track down in order to find the mastermind.

 

Throughout the film, The Riddler leaves cards addressed to Batman at the scene of the crime, usually attached to or at the side of his victims.

 

The “El Rata Alada” riddle was found on District Attorney Gil Colson, who had been rigged with a bomb set to detonate if he didn’t name the person at the head of Gotham’s corruption.

 

The Batman and Jim Gordon at first assume “the winged rat” was Colin Farrell’s Oz, as his Penguin alias refers to a winged creature. They also deliberated over the fact that bats are winged creatures too, but they ultimately ended up at John Turturro’s Carmine Falcone, referring to the wings of a Falcon

It was interesting that the Riddler didn't think through how the term could accidentally be tied back to either Penguin or even Batman. He was so fixated on directing attention to Falcone.

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On 3/4/2022 at 9:32 AM, The Commissioner said:

I answered all of the questions correctly and was given a password protected file titled "Thomas_Wayne_Lies"

Nice!!!

 

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Loved the part near the end when Batman was talking to the Riddler and he just starts saying, "Bruce Wayne" and then follows up with "We almost got him..."

I thought it was going to be a scene like the end of the "Hush" comics where the Riddler actually figures out Batman's identity but Batman convinces him that revealing his identity would ruin the greatest riddle of all.

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On 3/4/2022 at 4:48 AM, Bosco685 said:

Anyone catch the 1966 bust as a nod to the TV show? Even that was inserted to celebrate Batman history.

I didn't catch that.  Was it a bust of Adam West?

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On 3/4/2022 at 9:45 AM, The Commissioner said:

Loved the part near the end when Batman was talking to the Riddler and he just starts saying, "Bruce Wayne" and then follows up with "We almost got him..."

I thought it was going to be a scene like the end of the "Hush" comics where the Riddler actually figures out Batman's identity but Batman convinces him that revealing his identity would ruin the greatest riddle of all.

That was another nice touch!

I really thought Riddler was calling him out until he noted how they both came close to getting Bruce. That was such a great realization Riddler was not so in the know as he conveyed. To include blaming Thomas Wayne for the reporter's death and it turned out it was Carmine Falcone twisting facts so expertly even when found it couldn't cleanly tie back to him.

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On 3/4/2022 at 9:20 AM, Bosco685 said:

THE RIDDLER’S SPANISH RIDDLE “EL RATA ALADA” IN THE BATMAN EXPLAINED

It was interesting that the Riddler didn't think through how the term could accidentally be tied back to either Penguin or even Batman. He was so fixated on directing attention to Falcone.

I had read that but it doesn't answer my question. 

My question is: what did the Penguin get from the Riddle that they didn't get? He makes fun of them for misinterpretting the spanish and makes a big scene of it. So what was their mistake in the translation that the Penguin caught and which meant it could not be him?

 

And also I think winged rat referring to a bat was deliberate on Riddler's part, to further confuse him and see if he could see beyond it.

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On 3/4/2022 at 10:14 AM, William-James88 said:

I had read that but it doesn't answer my question. 

My question is: what did the Penguin get from the Riddle that they didn't get? He makes fun of them for misinterpretting the spanish and makes a big scene of it. So what was their mistake in the translation that the Penguin caught and which meant it could not be him?

 

And also I think winged rat referring to a bat was deliberate on Riddler's part, to further confuse him and see if he could see beyond it.

It was the intent of the word 'rat' not as an animal but as a noun (someone that snitches).

The 'El Rata Alada' Riddle from 'The Batman,' Explained

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What does el rata alada mean?
Roughly speaking, the phrase means "rat with wings." We say roughly because, as a police officer points out, it is grammatically incorrect Spanish. This is initially dismissed as being simply because The Riddler is bad at Spanish – a theory that Wayne and Gordon are a little too quick to jump on seeing as they think they are dealing with a criminal mastermind. This is an error on their part, as is made clear later in the film.

 

They quickly work out that rat is being used as a play on words, meaning both the rodent and a "rat" as in someone who sells out their associates. "Rat with wings" is also a way that many people describe pigeons, however, so they make the leap that they may be looking for a stool pigeon – a slang phrase for a police informant.

 

What does El Rata Alada have to do with The Riddler's website?

Here's where the fact that the phrase is bad Spanish comes into play.

 

Their first guess is that the phrase might refer to The Penguin (Colin Farrell) – after all, if he is the rat, then he is at once the rat and The Penguin – in other words, a rat with wings. (This reasoning amazingly turns out to be fairly sound, though the person they are looking for is someone else.)

 

However, when they confront The Penguin, they realise he is not who they are looking for – though he gives them the crucial clue. When they say the phrase "el rata alada" to him, he points out what's wrong with it. Because rat is a feminine noun in Spanish, it should be "la rata".

 

So why has The Riddler used the wrong definite article to refer to the rat? Because it is part of an aural pun, of the type that probably had frequent crossword solver shouting at the screen.

 

After, the full clue is "you are el rata alada." Say it out loud: U R L rata alada." Not only is the riddle a clue about who they are looking for, but also it is a website, Rataalada.com. In The Batman, the website is a place where they can communicate with The Riddler and work out who his new target is. In real life, it is a website set up by Warner Bros. where fans can try and solve The Riddler's puzzles for themselves (as revealed in the brief post-credit sequence at the end of the film.)

 

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On 3/4/2022 at 10:24 AM, Bosco685 said:

It was the intent of the word 'rat' not as an animal but as a noun (someone that snitches).

The 'El Rata Alada' Riddle from 'The Batman,' Explained

 

ah, thanks, makes more sense. Now I get it, the term used should be la. Ok, I was going at this wrong, it doesnt really prove Penguin's innocence or anything though, they just take his word for it that he ain't no rat.

Edited by William-James88
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