Comic Dealers in the 1970s
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36 posts in this topic

On 10/28/2021 at 6:49 AM, Toz said:

Looking through a Bronze Avengers and remembering all the old ads of "Comics For Sale".Robert Bell,Howard M.Rogofsky,Richard Ald,Passic Book Center,etc... I ordered a few from Richard Alf once,A Thor # 193,an Amazin Adventures with Killraven but don't remember the number and a couple more that I forget.You had to list a second choice if they were out of a copy you wanted.I got the Thor but can't recall the rest.He also included a copy of his mini comic Alf #1.Always wanter a # 2 but never got it. I also got a price list from somewhere else but but never ordered any more after that.

My question is,does anyone here still have the catalogs from the sellers back then? It would be really cool to see them. Also any stories if you ordered too.

one of my faves that advertised in Savage Sword was Moondance Comics-love their ads-also advertised alot of cool posters that I had never seen before. 

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On 11/27/2021 at 6:02 PM, pemart1966 said:

...and who might this be for those of us not in the know?  Or..do I even want to know?   lol

The guy form mile high, Chuck (thumbsu

Behind The famous mile high find, that originally led to a pedigree.

Edited by ADAMANTIUM
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On 11/27/2021 at 6:02 PM, jimjum12 said:

Chuck was very instrumental to the hobby. Beside the Church collection he brought the MHII collection mainstream with double page sales lists in every Marvel comic for a few months... he sure didn't mind "putting his money where his mouth was" ... Anyone who cares about the old school dealers and marketplace, Tales From The Data Base is a very informative and entertaining series of articles that are preserved on his website. Another goldmine of info in the same vein are Vincent Zurzolo's interviews on Comic Zone Radio, which are collected on the Metropolis website. In addition to dozens of Dealer interviews, there are also interviews with creators.  GOD BLESS ... 

-jimbo(a friend of jesus)(thumbsu

  If he tried to do today what he did to get the money for MH2, he'd be in jail.  It's easy to do deals like that when its not your money.

It was legal at the time, but still very sketchy. 

 

Edited by shadroch
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Great memories from the mail order days.  My first exposure was Howard Rogofsky in the early 70s.  Action #1 was listed for $400 and I recall telling my late father to buy it.  Oh if he would have listened!  I ended up purchasing books from Robert Bell, as his catalog focused on affordable silver age issues.  Paper route money only goes so far!  Good times.

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I didn’t trust the Mail for comics, but I did buy often from the Bud Plant catalog.

I’d scour every page and circle dozens of items I wanted. Usually could afford one or two of them. 

Still have some of the signed bookplates and hardcovers. Good times!

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On 11/28/2021 at 12:08 AM, shadroch said:

  If he tried to do today what he did to get the money for MH2, he'd be in jail.  It's easy to do deals like that when its not your money.

It was legal at the time, but still very sketchy. 

 

Could you please elaborate about this? I know about the MH2 collection, but I don't know the back story.

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On 12/7/2021 at 10:59 AM, Math Teacher said:

Could you please elaborate about this? I know about the MH2 collection, but I don't know the back story.

It was a popular finacing scheme at the time.  Business has X amount of inventory, and sales of Y per week.    You get one of your employees to " make you an offer" to buy your business.  Because they have great credit and hopefully own their own home, they get a business loan at a great rate. It is helpful if they qualify as a minority or a vet because that checks a few more boxes.  Chuck "sold" his business to an employee, who financed the sale via a bank loan , used the proceeds of the "sale" to make the the MH2 purchase, then turned around and took over the payments and bought back his business.  He, in effect, used a straw buyer to get a loan he evidently couldn't get on his own. 

As I said, it wasn't illegal at the time and he was far from the only person who did so, but the law caught up with this practice and now you'd face bank fraud charges.

Chuckles tells the story far better than I ever could, in his Tales from the Database on his website.  It's an interesting tale. If nothing else, it shows how driven he is.

How he managed to transfer 2,500,000 plus books from Long Island to Denver was fascinating if you understand logistics.

If you've never read his blog, it's both educational and entertaining. 

Edited by shadroch
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