Archived

This topic is now archived and is closed to further replies.

Official movie review of The Wolverine. Good? Bad?

201 posts in this topic

Surprised no one started a thread about seeing this movie yet.

 

I have not seen it yet, but I have assumed since viewing the first preview this movie was going to be an epic POS!

 

However I know a couple boardies via their Facebook posts that have reviewed this movie who said it was really good.

 

Good it be this movie doesn't blow? :o

 

So chime in guys!

 

How was it? :popcorn:

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I kind of wish I hadn't bothered seeing it. It wasn't anything special. There were good fight scenes and story momentum in the first half of the movie, but the second half of the movie seemed very standard in the way everything was just kind of resolved.

 

 

I didn't like Wolverine reaching into his heart through his upper abdomen to remove the device disabling his power. There are some anatomical barriers there. Plus, it was never explained how it got there. Did they attach it, let his healing powers heal the incision, then activate it to begin blocking his powers? Did all that happen at the point that Viper sneaked into his room and breathed green mist into his mouth? I'm sure I missed a detail somewhere, but the story didn't quite stick together in those key details.

 

I didn't quite get why Viper died twice. The shedding of skin as a way of shrugging off an arrow through the heart didn't play well at all and it was pretty pointless as she was killed(?) only minutes later.

 

Also, the reveal of Yashida inside the Silver Samurai suit was clumsy and the effect looked kind of dorky. Maybe I'm just tired of robotic CGI.

 

Even the tag scene wasn't very good. Was that really the best place to confront Wolverine, in a crowded airport, just for the metal detector gag?

 

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I heard there is something after the credits right?
I didn't stay to the final credits, but yes, there's a scene after the first round of credits. It didn't strike me as anything special. We already know there's an X-Men movie in production and we know most of the characters in it. If there was one after the final credits, I can't comment. It was after midnight and I didn't have the energy to wait another 10 minutes. :)
Link to comment
Share on other sites

I kind of wish I hadn't bothered seeing it. It wasn't anything special. There were good fight scenes and story momentum in the first half of the movie, but the second half of the movie seemed very standard in the way everything was just kind of resolved.

 

Sooo, did I waste my time rereading the 4 minis to get pumped for this release? (seeing it tonight)

 

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I kind of wish I hadn't bothered seeing it. It wasn't anything special. There were good fight scenes and story momentum in the first half of the movie, but the second half of the movie seemed very standard in the way everything was just kind of resolved.

 

Sooo, did I waste my time rereading the 4 minis to get pumped for this release? (seeing it tonight)

 

Depends on how much you want the movie to resemble the minis...

Link to comment
Share on other sites

(CNN) -- When Hugh Jackman first called his director for "The Wolverine," James Mangold told him that he had had an inspiration after reading the -script. Mangold wanted to to make the set-in-Japan film similar to "The Outlaw Josey Wales" by making the mutant a Josey Wales with healing powers. Jackman hadn't seen the classic Clint Eastwood film, so Mangold sent him a copy.

 

"I felt like tonally, it would give him a clue of what I was talking about," the director said.

 

The director started thinking about the deep affinity between gun-slinging Westerns and swordfighting samurai films. Mangold thought that drawing upon both of them would help "The Wolverine" stand apart from the rest of the X-Men series.

 

This installment takes place after "X-Men: The Last Stand," as Wolverine retreats from killing the love of his life, Jean Grey/Dark Phoenix, and heads to Japan. It is based on the comic by Chris Claremont and Frank Miller, and Mangold thought of it as Hugh Jackman in a Western in Japan, without the horse. To make sense of this movie mashup, the director tweeted images from the top ten inspirations for "The Wolverine," daring fans to identify them.

 

Astute fans of Mangold's body of work (which includes "Cop Land," "Walk the Line" and "3:10 to Yuma") might have spotted the 1959 Yasujiro Ozu film "Floating Weeds," since the director has cited it as one of the best films of all time as well as a major influence on his first film, "Heavy."

 

"Ozu is the most underappreciated Japanese director, in my mind," Mangold said. "For me, the whole trip that Logan takes south to the Nagasaki area, it's almost the reverse train trip that the older couple take in 'Tokyo Story.' "

 

"But it's also about that sense of the beauty and simplicity of rural Japanese life," he added. "When I started scouting Japan, the world of the Ozu films still exists. You ride south; you find yourself in a simple fishing village, and it looks unchanged since the postwar period."

 

Depicting the atomic bomb being dropped on Nagasaki in "The Wolverine," and the community's recovery, was a useful allegory for Jackman's character: "Out of all the pain and the catastrophe and loss that he had suffered in his life, he's in a place that keeps going," Mangold said. "They keep living, and they keep loving, despite the atrocities that have happened."

 

Also on the list of Mangold's top films of all time is 1947's Himalayas-set "Black Narcissus," about a group of nuns establishing a convent. It was an influence on one of his most acclaimed films, "Girl, Interrupted."

 

"In regards to 'Girl, Interrupted,' it's a conscribed universe with these women all trapped in one place," Mangold said. "But in 'The Wolverine,' it's the tone, which is both realistic and dreamy, the sense of travel to the exotic land and the buried sensuality in this new place."

 

Mangold planted one shot as a direct homage to "Black Narcissus" in "The Wolverine": when a woman runs out of a building and seems on the verge of throwing herself over a cliff into the sea.

 

"That's from the final sequence of 'Black Narcissus,' " Mangold said, "from when the nun who goes mad is chasing Deborah Kerr around and they show downward with the cliffs."

 

On the Western front, Mangold cites two classics: 1953's "Shane" and Eastwood's 1976 film "The Outlaw Josey Wales."

 

" 'Shane' is because of the dark outlaw who is brought into town, comes into a new village and changes everyone's lives but can never stay," Mangold said. "He's a soldier of fortune, a vagabond. Logan is like that Western hero, a man who can never stop moving."

 

In "The Outlaw Josey Wales," Eastwood's character loses his wife and children in the very beginning, and it sets him off on a journey built on his rage and loss -- which echoes not just in Logan's loss of Jean Grey but the perceived loss of his mentor, Dr. Charles Xavier, seemingly destroyed by the Dark Phoenix.

 

"It's also the journey," Mangold said, "and how the enemy is not clear. It's kind of a labyrinth. And it's also about a wounded soldier trying to get home again. In the end of 'Josey Wales,' it's not like he's victorious against any enemy. He just literally finds a new place to live and love again and the courage to do it."

 

Then, of course, there are the samurai films such as the "The Samurai Trilogy": 1954's "Samurai I: Musashi Miyamoto," 1955's "Samurai II: Duel at Ichijoji Temple" and 1956's "Samurai III: Duel at Ganryu Island."

 

"The imagery is incredibly fantastical," Mangold said. "It's not the kind of desolation you'd find in the Kurosawa films. They're extremely lyrical and colorful, with beautiful sets, beautiful design, beautiful use of color."

 

Two films noir are also on Mangold's list: William Friedkin's 1971 thriller "The French Connection" and Roman Polanski's 1974 neo-noir "Chinatown." Mangold said he values all of the films even beyond the inspiration they provided for his latest project.

 

"All of these movies are huge to me anyway," he said. "And they spoke to me as I was working on the -script and preparing for this shoot. But they've been touchstones to me all my life."

 

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I kind of wish I hadn't bothered seeing it. It wasn't anything special. There were good fight scenes and story momentum in the first half of the movie, but the second half of the movie seemed very standard in the way everything was just kind of resolved.

 

Sooo, did I waste my time rereading the 4 minis to get pumped for this release? (seeing it tonight)

 

Depends on how much you want the movie to resemble the minis...

It's been a while since I read the Claremont/Miller series, but the movie would be more accurately described as "based on characters and situations introduced in…"

 

As far as the article and quotes from Mangold, I can see the tone he was setting, and that's why I felt there was good buildup in the first half. I imagine that the second half underwent a bit of rewriting and editing which turned it into a minor mess. It's a case where a Director's Cut could be worth watching.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I heard there is something after the credits right?

 

The after credits scene makes it all worthwhile. :D

 

 

Can you do a spoiler alert and tell me what it is?

 

Rather not pay money to see this movie till comes out on red box.

 

DON'T CLICK ON THIS LINK IF YOU WANT TO AVOID WHAT IT SAYS ABOUT THE WOLVERINE POST-CREDITS SCENE.

 

Wolverine end credits scene discussion

 

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I heard there is something after the credits right?

 

The after credits scene makes it all worthwhile. :D

 

 

Can you do a spoiler alert and tell me what it is?

 

Rather not pay money to see this movie till comes out on red box.

 

DON'T CLICK ON THIS LINK IF YOU WANT TO AVOID WHAT IT SAYS ABOUT THE WOLVERINE POST-CREDITS SCENE.

 

Wolverine end credits scene discussion

 

 

I read it andddddddddd about time! :banana:

 

I will buy a ticket to this movie and will just walk in the when the credits start because this movie is such a filler POS movie.

 

Bring on the good stuff finally!

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I read it andddddddddd about time! :banana:

 

I will buy a ticket to this movie and will just walk in the when the credits start because this movie is such a filler POS movie.

 

Bring on the good stuff finally!

 

May as well watch the entire movie. I look forward to the review.

 

:wishluck::popcorn:

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I read it andddddddddd about time! :banana:

 

I will buy a ticket to this movie and will just walk in the when the credits start because this movie is such a filler POS movie.

 

Bring on the good stuff finally!

 

May as well watch the entire movie. I look forward to the review.

 

:wishluck::popcorn:

 

 

Well unfortunately my girlie friend is making me see this tomorrow night here in San Diego at a bar/out door theater this weekend. I agreed to it so I have to go with her. Well at least I can get old school vodka there.

 

On Monday I get my dignity back apparently. lol

 

seven-year-itch.jpg

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I loved The Wolverine :whee:

 

It was hell of a lot better than X-Men Origins:Wolverine.

 

It wasn't a cluster**** like Origins was (shoehorning every mutant they can on screen :ohnoez: )

 

It felt more like a James Bond movie than a X-Men film (I think it was for the better IMO)

 

There were hints of Claremont's Mini-Series,but everything else was for the film.

 

Rila Fukushima was great as Yukio (she stole most of her scenes in the film and she was a fun character to watch on screen :grin: )

 

Overall I give it a 4 out of 5 :banana: :banana: :banana: :banana:

 

 

What keeps it a perfect 5 is the Jean Gray scenes were very confusing for me (is she dead?,why is she in Wolverine's dreams?,why is she even in the movie?

These are questions that I can't explain (shrug) )

 

All I can say is X-Men:The Last Stand just became an important part of the X-Men Trilogy when it comes to Days of Future Past (stay after the post-credits and you'll know why :gossip: )

 

 

The Wolverine gets my Wolverine fan approval (thumbs u

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I read it andddddddddd about time! :banana:

 

I will buy a ticket to this movie and will just walk in the when the credits start because this movie is such a filler POS movie.

 

Bring on the good stuff finally!

 

May as well watch the entire movie. I look forward to the review.

 

:wishluck::popcorn:

 

 

SOT REVIEW -

 

This movie sucked the biggest balls ever. I hate more than anything but Lebron.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I read it andddddddddd about time! :banana:

 

I will buy a ticket to this movie and will just walk in the when the credits start because this movie is such a filler POS movie.

 

Bring on the good stuff finally!

 

May as well watch the entire movie. I look forward to the review.

 

:wishluck::popcorn:

 

 

SOT REVIEW -

 

This movie sucked the biggest balls ever. I hate more than anything but Lebron.

 

Its blew balls. (shrug)

 

and nothing is more over rated than LaFraud and the joke comparison to him and the true King that is dunking above your last post!

Link to comment
Share on other sites